No Minister

Your Saturday morning explosion (x2)

with 2 comments

Who doesn’t like watching explosions? Especially when it’s destroying a wind farm, like this one in New Mexico. It’s also a brand new industry and one with a solid future.

The notes for the video say that having the 90 units felled permitted the wind farm owner to complete salvage of blades and drive-train elements from some of the wind turbines to provide replacement parts for similar units they operate at other wind farm locations.

But given the destruction we’re seeing here I just don’t see how what replacement parts they could be talking about. Enjoy the explosions.

These units look to be only twenty years old, judging by the design, but that does seem to be their lifespan, which is decades less than any other type of power station.

Each state has its own laws for cleaning up old industrial sites, which is probably why the following wind farm in Ohio has not been given the same treatment, instead being allowed to simply rot and make the landscape even uglier than when they were working. What a desolate sight.

I don’t believe there is anywhere in the U.S. where you can develop a mining project without putting up a bond or some other security to pay for the restoration of the site after the mine is closed. Obviously nothing like that was done with regard to the project you see in the video, but then it was probably built and then abandoned by a bankrupt single-purpose developer cashing in on the PTC every time it gets renewed:

“We get a tax credit if we build a lot of wind farms. That’s the only reason to build them.” Warren Buffet

Explosive demolition certainly needs to happen to the old, outdated wind turbines in the Altamont Pass that are such an eyesore seen from the I-580 interstate that leads to San Francisco. They look more like the old water pump windmills of American ranches.

Meanwhile over on the Beauty – both Nature and Human post, regular commentator Andrei wrote a paean to the beauty of human machinery and what can happen if it’s not taken care of, so I decided to add to this post with an example of that.

Written by Tom Hunter

June 5, 2021 at 6:00 am

2 Responses

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  1. Love a good Bang

    rossco

    June 5, 2021 at 10:18 am

  2. A little Greenie might ask why go bang?

    Well here is the answer:

    In the GE 1.5-megawatt model, the nacelle alone weighs more than 56 tons, the blade assembly weighs more than 36 tons, and the tower itself weighs about 71 tons — a total weight of 164 tons.

    The blades being made of carbon fibre will be buried either in New Mexico, or Wyoming or North Dakota in big pits.

    The base. The base weighs 1000 tons or more, excluding the rebar cage. Very big bang required, lots of flying concrete.

    I believe the ones in the North Sea more less float.

    Some new turbines and towers will be over 600 feet tall…..great. One pollution form traded for another.

    Nah… walk away

    Dont you just love the little Greenies and their little minds..cant even understand basic economics or science for that matter.

    Less than 15 years before the bang I suspect!

    rossco

    June 5, 2021 at 10:30 am


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