No Minister

Archive for the ‘Ideologues’ Category

“Even North Korea is not this nuts”

leave a comment »

That’s not from this Babylon Bee tweet, despite it being another of their wonderful pieces of satire.

Now you may be thinking that photoshopping North Korea’s Kim Jong Un into a modern American university lecture theatre is over-the-top, even for a satirical story.

But that would be before you read this article about a North Korean defector named Yeonmi Park, who has recently graduated from Columbia University.

Park is one of the more famous defectors, having written a 2015 memoir called “In Order to Live”, in which she chronicled her life in the repressive regime of North Korea and her eventual escape with her mother. At the age of 13 she saw people die of starvation right in front of her. When she and her mother managed to get across the border into China they were captured by human slavers. Having been freed by Christian missionaries she still ended up having to walk across the Gobi desert before she got to South Korea.

Then she moved to the USA and went to one of the great Ivy League universities.

“I expected that I was paying this fortune, all this time and energy, to learn how to think. But they are forcing you to think the way they want you to think,” she said. “I realized, wow, this is insane. I thought America was different but I saw so many similarities to what I saw in North Korea that I started worrying.”

Her money quote:

“Even North Korea is not this nuts. North Korea was pretty crazy, but not this crazy.”

When you read the details she supplies about her education you can understand why she came to this conclusion.

Like in North Korea, Park said she witnessed example after example of anti-Western sentiment and guilt-tripping. During her orientation, for instance, a staff member scolded her for liking classic literature, such as the writings of Jane Austen.

“I said ‘I love those books.’ I thought it was a good thing,” Park said of her orientation. “Then she said, ‘Did you know those writers had a colonial mindset? They were racists and bigots and are subconsciously brainwashing you.’”

Heh. I encountered a number of feminists in the 1980’s with a very low opinion of Jane Austen, because she did not fit their conceptions of what a feminist was. To say the least their opinions of the woman were primitive and reductive, but by the late 1990’s things had turned around, with increased celebration of Ms Austen’s feminist traits.

Just in time to now be a “colonialist” and a racist.

Yeonmi Park

Her professors gave students “trigger warnings,” sharing the wording from readings in advance so people could opt out of reading or even sitting in class during discussions, Park told The Post.

“Going to Columbia, the first thing I learned was ‘safe space,’” she said.

“Every problem, they explained us, is because of white men.” Some of the discussions of white privilege reminded her of the caste system in her native country, where people were categorized based on their ancestors, she said.

The similarities with North Korea mounted up, but at least the North Koreans had some rationale in defending their system, which they did partly by hating on Americans. As Ms Park points out there seem to be rather a lot of Americans who also hate America.

When it came to gender pronouns and manipulation of the English language, Park was even more confused.

“English is my third language. I learned it as an adult. I sometimes still say ‘he’ or ‘she’ by mistake and now they are going to ask me to call them ‘they’? How the heck do I incorporate that into my sentences?” she remembered asking herself. “It was chaos. It felt like the regression in civilization.”

It is a regression in civilisation. And it comes from being in a “safe space”.

“Because I have seen oppression, I know what it looks like,” she said. “These kids keep saying how they’re oppressed, how much injustice they’ve experienced. They don’t know how hard it is to be free.”

The paradox of supposedly being taught about “oppression”, “injustice” and being “free” is that it’s producing graduates who actually don’t know anything about them.

Park said as a child she had thought dictator Kim Jong Un was “starving” and overworked until she was in South Korea and was shown pictures that showed how large he was in pictures compared to other people who looked thin and hungry.

“That’s what it does when you’re brainwashed …. Oh my God, why did I not notice that he was fat?’ Because I never learned how to think critically. That is what is happening in America, people see things but they’ve just completely lost the ability to think critically.”

More paradox, this time courtesy of “Critical Theory”. Or perhaps irony is a better term?

“You guys have lost common sense to a degree that I as a North Korean cannot even comprehend,” she said. “Where are we going from here? There’s no rule of law, no morality, nothing is good or bad anymore, it’s complete chaos. I guess that’s what they want, to destroy every single thing and rebuild into a Communist paradise.”

I don’t agree with that last, although I can see why she would think that. The fact is that outside of a tiny fringe of real Marxists there are few who believe in that, mainly because there are so many grifting, money hungry Leftists tearing things up just to make a buck for themselves:

But that doesn’t mean they can’t cause an awful lot of damage to American society as they claw in the money while forcing everybody else to bend to their whims.

Eventually, Park stopped arguing with her professors and “learned how to just shut up” so that she could graduate.

“I literally crossed the Gobi Desert to be free and I realized I’m not free, America’s not free.

Well she did still graduate, and she got to talk to reporters about this – but only once she escaped from the university, and to paraphrase Andrew Sullivan, once we all live on campus…

“All strong males”

with one comment

Last week, on a flight from LA to Atlanta, one of the passengers came unglued and got hold of the plane’s PA system where he began yakking about the oxygen masks.

The guy was also wearing a helmet with elbow and knee pads like those used by roller bladers, and started yelling about how he was “going to take the plane down”.

Turns out that was an off-duty flight attendant and was promptly tackled by other members of the crew. However, that struggle rapidly turned into an intense fight, at which point the pilot got on the PA system and made the following call for help:

“This is the captain speaking. We’d like all strong males to come to the front of the aircraft to handle a problem passenger,”

Which call promptly brought forward a bunch of such men who tackled the guy and got him down and subdued while the plane made an emergency stop in Oklahoma City. It got to Atlanta a few hours later. You can see video of the fight at the link.

The thing that strikes me about this is that even with all our aspirations of gender equality, when the shit hits the fan, this is what happens in a true emergency. A passenger went wild and threatened to bring down the plane, and the standard of who must act now was: “all strong males.”

And just about all the men stepped up to do the job.

However much we minimize discussion of that aspect of reality, it seems that in our hardwired brains we do understand that.

Much thanks to the men.

Written by Tom Hunter

June 15, 2021 at 10:57 am

Posted in Ideologues, USA

Tagged with

Jump Joe, Jump

with 2 comments

Manchin that is, Joe Manchin, who is a Democrat Senator from West Virginia – and the jump he should make is to the Republican party since he has just blown up his own party’s plans for destroying the Senate filibuster, thereby screwing a lot of other revolutionary Democrat Party schemes.

Getting rid of the filibuster for all legislation would still have required Vice President Harris to be the tie-braking vote each time, but it would have enabled the Democrats to do whatever they wanted with 51 Senate votes, including packing the Supreme Court.

However the primary goal would have been to pass their “Voting Rights” bill – H.R.1 “For The People Act” (propaganda should always start with a good phrase) – that would federalise (centralise) election management in Washington D.C. and ensure they’d rule the Federal US government as they rule California and Illinois (the Democrats hope).

Manchin told his party to take a hike on that one as well:

I believe that partisan voting legislation will destroy the already weakening binds of our democracy, and for that reason, I will vote against the For the People Act. Furthermore, I will not vote to weaken or eliminate the filibuster. For as long as I have the privilege of being your U.S. senator, I will fight to represent the people of West Virginia, to seek bipartisan compromise no matter how difficult and to develop the political bonds that end divisions and help unite the country we love.

The Democrat Senate caucus meetings may be a tad frosty for a while.

But it’s among the Democrat political activists and MSM journalists where things have naturally dropped to the level of carpet-biting rage, including the following entirely predictable claim about Manchin:

Wow! This is a stunningly original critique from Hill and Jones. It must be all of five minutes since a Republican was called a White Supremacist keen on reviving Jim Crow, but now an Old, White, Male Democrat is getting the treatment! Things must getting serious on “the most dangerous threat to our democracy” front.

Hill is a noted race grifter, having turned a failing gig on ESPN as a sports commentator into a  career as a “journalist” who makes charges of racism against just about everyone who breathes.

However Manchin is not alone. A few weeks ago I noted that he’s been joined in these actions by Arizona Democrat Senator Kyrsten Sinema, whose “Fuck Off” ring and general demeanour show that she’s a younger generation that is wise to all this MSM/Social Media “rage” bullshit and is not intimidated by it.

I also would not be surprised to learn that there are other Democrat Senators who aren’t that keen on all these grand plans either, given the electoral risks involved, but who are quite happy to use Manchin as a shield.

The voters even more so; while they aren’t vocal, there are still a lot of “liberals” who are more middle of the road politically. Manchin, though he seems like a unicorn, is actually a lot more representative than people think he is.

BTW, nearly 70% of West Virginians voted for Trump so Manchin is basically just representing his constituents, which is his job, and naturally he would also like to keep his job. It’s the reddest state in the union in regards to presidential politics.

As result, every single time a raging leftie Democrat goes after him, he gains more credibility for re-election in that state via Republican voters. The media hate him and his own party despises him. They aren’t trying to earn his support, rather, they are seeking to destroy him.

Moreover do these fanatical FaceTwit idiots understand that all of this may actually drive Manchin into the arms of the Republican Party aside from re-election? He has to know that this isn’t going to get any better. The Democrat Party is not moderating.

The old blue-dog era is dead and buried. Manchin may still have a dream of winding the clock back to 1996 but it’s more a hallucination. Woke politics is now at the forefront, as that old friend of segregationists and tough criminal laws, Joe Biden. shows everyday. Does Manchin really want to stick around so he can get called a racist and a supporter of Jim Crow by his own party?

In fact Manchin doesn’t even have to become a Republican. Instead he can become an independent, negotiate with Republicans for whatever committee assignments he wants in exchange for caucusing with them and tell Chuck Schumer and the rest of the Democrats to go fuck themselves.

All of the above is why I wasn’t interested in the hysterical screaming from the US Right when they found themselves facing Democrat control of all three branches of the Federal government after January. That control was razor thin in all three areas. Even with a huge increase in the popular vote the Electoral College win by Biden was slim – in terms of vote difference in the key swing states it was actually smaller than Trump’s win in 2016. The five-six Senate seats the Democrats expected to win never happened and it was only thanks to the unusual event of having not one but two runoff elections in a single state, Georgia, that they even got a tie. As for the House, the GOP lost no seats and cleaned up a dozen or so Democrats, bringing them to within half-a-dozen votes of sending Nancy Pelosi to her final ash heap.

This is nothing like 2008 when the Democrats got all three branches with overwhelming majorities. Back then every US Right winger had serious cause for concern at what they could get done. But sufficient Democrats know how close they are to the razor’s edge to not push things too far.

In theory you could say the same thing about the GOP but the difference here is that it’s the Democrats who are pushing extremist policies across the board, where even a seemingly normal infrastructure bill that could be bipartisan is reduced to being nothing but a porkfest where only simple bribery might get GOP votes. Although the Democrat Operatives with Bylines in the US MSM and around the world do their damndest to portray the opposite, after 2016 few are stupid enough to think that the MSM represents many voters.

The Democrat coalition is unsustainable. The radicals have taken over the leadership, either directly or via proxy, and the further things move left, the more the party splits in two.

Written by Tom Hunter

June 10, 2021 at 3:49 pm

Got ya daily dose of batshit insanity right here

leave a comment »

This is actually a good follow up to the previous post about modern university education in the USA and in general.

Yale University is one of the famous Ivy League colleges in the USA, which actually started the term in relation to their sports teams but gradually extended it to everything else about themselves, as Wiki explains:

The term Ivy League is typically used beyond the sports context to refer to the eight schools as a group of elite colleges with connotations of academic excellenceselectivity in admissions, and social elitism.

Despite it’s centuries old success, famous graduates and incredible wealth (their 2019 endowments totaled $30.3 billion) Yale has been taking quite a few hits in recent years.

A recent event won’t help. A psychiatrist named Dr. Aruna Khilanani, lecturing at Yale’s Child Study Center, was invited by the university to give a guest lecture and she jumped at the chance with:

‘The Psychopathic Problem of the White Mind’.

Yeah Baby!

Click on the link to the substack article, which in turn has an upload of the audio recording. It’s a doozy. Here’s just some sample quotes:

  • This is the cost of talking to white people at all. The cost of your own life, as they suck you dry. There are no good apples out there. White people make my blood boil. (Time stamp: 6:45)
  • I had fantasies of unloading a revolver into the head of any white person that got in my way, burying their body, and wiping my bloody hands as I walked away relatively guiltless with a bounce in my step. Like I did the world a fucking favor. (Time stamp: 7:17)
  • We are now in a psychological predicament, because white people feel that we are bullying them when we bring up race. They feel that we should be thanking them for all that they have done for us. They are confused, and so are we. We keep forgetting that directly talking about race is a waste of our breath. We are asking a demented, violent predator who thinks that they are a saint or a superhero, to accept responsibility. It ain’t gonna happen. They have five holes in their brain. It’s like banging your head against a brick wall. It’s just like sort of not a good idea. (Time stamp 17:13)

Rather than lambasting this fucked up woman as a bigot and a racist I think we should just conclude that she simply should not have anything to do with psychiatry and should be moved into another field. Caring for pet gerbils perhaps, although I’d fear for the lives of the albino ones.

Got the bastards! Now where’s that revolver?

But with a mind and a worldview like that, the universities that gave her a degree – apparently Cornell and NYU – should be fucking investigated to find out what the hell is going on inside them. At a minimum her employer should be made aware of all this, but they probably already know all about her since people like this lack self-awareness and discretion and lose control of themselves: I’d bet good money that she just cannot keep her mouth shut at work.

Dr. Khilanani is also obviously in desperate need of treatment from her own profession, but perhaps that would be a mistake. I have a cousin with a PhD in psychiatry who lectured at university on the subject some years ago. Long retired he is now and – as one other cousin recently remarked – “As crazy as a a shit house rat”, so perhaps it just comes with the territory?

Written by Tom Hunter

June 7, 2021 at 2:00 pm

Grok Love Cave

One of may favourite American essayists and humourists is Iowahawk, (real name, David Burge).

While I understand his move to Twitter I don’t like it. I more appreciate the blog he wrote in until 2014, but he’s been puncturing pretentious pricks for more than two decades on many platforms.

Such as this old piece he originally published in 1999, College Profs Denounce Western Culture, Move to Caves:

A passionate critic of Euro-American “linear thought,” Grok is one of a growing number of college professors around the nation who have relocated to caves, mud huts and makeshift sweat lodges to demonstrate their disdain for western culture and technology. For Grok, 44, the move to a cave was a natural step in his intellectual progression.

“My dissertation at Columbia synthesized the seminal works of Jacques Lacan, Derrida, and Michel Foucault,” says Grok, referring to the influential French deconstructionist philosophers. “I was able to prove, conclusively, that conclusiveness is not conclusive.”

Of course what could be pointed at and laughed about in 1999, or even 2014, doesn’t seem so funny now that it’s running loose in the wild. Still, read and enjoy Grok’s adventures:

“I began to deconstruct everything I could get my hands on,” says Grok. “The Old Testament, Shakespeare, Dick and Jane, a 1967 J.C. Whitney catalog, the Boston phone book, you name it. I showed how everything is a lie, that everything could be deconstructed. Well, except Deconstruction, obviously.”

It was then that Grok published a series of influential articles in which he deconstructed the sciences. “I initially showed that the so-called ‘scientific method,’ so treasured by the self-appointed high priests of science, was nothing but a bizarre ritual of the industrialist phallocracy,” said Grok. “From there, it was a short intellectual leap to disprove the reality of the periodic tables, gravity and algebra.”

Despite being elected chairman of the Philosophy Department in 1995, Grok felt an intellectual void. “I needed some way to explain why literature and science were so bad, so putrid, so incredibly vile,” said Grok. “That’s when it dawned on me. They were the products of western culture.”

Being homeless on the streets is for wimps:

Grok says that each of his attempts to replace western technology brought more frustration. “Last year, when I was lying over a heating grate in my cardboard box, I realized I was merely a pawn of western industrialists. Like the developing world, I had been seduced and entrapped by their addictive steam and cardboard technology.”

Also modern medicine and food production:

“Finally, I have broken the cycle of oppression,” he says, violently hacking up a thick clot of blood-streaked mucus. He refuses my offer to contact medical assistance. Noting that “western medicine is merely a front for the hegemonic pharmaceutical industry,” Grok applies another leech to his chest.

“Like the indigenous peoples, I have everything I need here,” says Grok. “Especially stray dogs.”

Like the prairie bison to the Lakota Sioux, stray dogs are an important source of hides, meat and milk for Grok. A committed animal rights activist, he does not skin or eat the dogs until they have died of natural causes.

There are others too, as the idea spreads:

One convert is Eegah, chairperson of the department of gender studies at the University of Michigan, who now lives in a creek bed outside Ann Arbor.

“There is something very liberating, very empowering about abandoning phallocentric culture,” says Eegah, who was until recently known as Katherine Robinson. “Cave dwelling authenticates our visceral experience, releasing us from the bond of western patriarchal oppression.”

As an example, Eegah notes that she is no longer dependent on money. “I have adopted the traditional barter system of non-western, matriarchal societies. I get all the furs and meat I need by having sex with hobos.”

I suggest you bookmark this to compare with what you see and read in our current and future society.

Written by Tom Hunter

June 2, 2021 at 9:20 am

Posted in Humour, Ideologues, USA

Tagged with ,

Burn Loot Murder doesn’t care about Blacks

That’s no surprise to anybody who has studied what they actually do in the inner city areas of the USA.

However, as is usually the case with cults like Antifa, BLM or Stalinists, it takes former members getting woke to the bullshit for other people to start listening, although even then it doesn’t convince the True Believers, or those using it to grift political power, money or even down to the low level of blog comments.

Which is why the following little talk from one Rashad Turner is something to which attention must be paid:

In 2015 Turner helped to found Black Lives Matter in St. Paul, Minnesota. “I believed the organization stood for exactly what the name implies, black lives do matter,” he recounted. “However, after a year on the inside, I learned they have little concern for rebuilding black families and they cared even less about improving the quality of education for students in Minneapolis.”

Well of course they don’t. BLM was created by “trained Marxists” who see such things as tools by which Western capitalist democracies can be damaged enough to be destroyed. That’s always been the dream of Marxists and it’s always been a massive wank that has failed, as will BLM/Antifa.

But not before such Marxists cash in on the sweet, juicy capitalist loot, property ownership and “systemic racism”, all while causing a lot of damage, aided by people like naive people such as Turner who either did not know or did not care about such foundations.

I’d like to think that Turner’s revelation comes purely from a point of personal good will, rather than what I forecast in 2020, which is that in 2021 Democrats would find both BLM and Antifa no longer useful allies following the defeat of OrangeManBad.

Given the ongoing damage to Democrat cities the following should not be a surprise.

Still, there’s 2024 coming up.

Written by Tom Hunter

May 31, 2021 at 2:00 pm

California Screaming – Fire

For decades in the USA there has been a cartoon character who would warn the good people of America that:

Only YOU can prevent forest fires”.

Smokey the Bear was invented in 1944 by the US Forest Service as a way of enlisting the public in helping them fight forest fires, which was also a wartime concern as Japan tried forest fire attacks via balloons launched into the stratosphere aimed at the USA’s West Coast.

In addition to this the US Forest Service decided to throw everything and the kitchen sink at fighting these fires, using as much technology and manpower as they could afford, which was a lot in the booming post-war American economy. Their compatriots in the National Park service followed suit.

But as the years went by they began to notice that the fires were getting worse – much worse – even as they did everything to slow them down and stop them. Finally, in the early 1960’s, the Department of the Interior commissioned a study to look at ecosystem problems across the board in National Park, including predator control (Yellowstone elk were having to be constantly culled) and what came to be called fire ecology.

What the conclusions boiled down to for fire was that the “kill the fire” policy was actually making things worse because it was allowing huge buildups of fuel on the floors of the forests instead of steadily reducing and then stabilising it. So when fires did break out they became monsters.

So by the late 1960’s/early 70’s the policy was changed from suppression to management, allowing fires to burn while keeping an eye on them and acting only to protect developed areas. Events like the massive 1988 Yellowstone fires resulted in public and political backlash about this but although the decision criteria around fire fighting was modified the basic policy remained. However, the environmental movement began to impact this in other ways. Not that they went back to fire suppression, but – thinking that they were being kind to the environment – they started doing things that caused the same problems:

Shortly before leaving office in 2001, Clinton limited the ability of the United States Forest Service to thin out a dense thicket of foliage and downed trees on federal land to bring the West into a pristine state, Bob Zybach, an experienced forester with a PhD in environmental science, told the Daily Caller News Foundation. The former president’s decision created a ticking time bomb, Zybach argues.

“If you don’t start managing these forests, then they are going to start burning up. Thirty years later, they are still ignoring it,”

It was more than just underbrush management:

Under this policy, thousands of miles of forest roads were ripped out, roads built to allow the harvesting of timber, but also used by firefighters to access wildfires in the hinterlands before they spread to populated regions. And timber harvests plunged as much as 84 percent from 12 billion board feet per year to less than 2 billion board feet per year.

California was, as usual, the leader in this policy for the future, being even more fanatical than Clinton’s policies, (although other Western states like Colorado and Oregon are up there) reducing the state’s timber industry to less than a third the size of what it was 60 years ago. The state now imports 80% of its timber.

You would think that, given the natural dryness of California and the massive forests in the state, its leaders would not have been so stupid as to ignore the science. But even worse than the national logging policy, California’s Green sentiment also prevented controlled burns (for fear of disrupting animal habitats) and barred even minor brush-clearing programs.

As a result its forests are now twice as dense as they were 150 years ago — when the population was a fraction of today’s. Behind that unnatural density: state and federal rules that make it nearly impossible (and insanely expensive) to lay a finger on any of this precious overgrowth.

historically, ponderosa pines grew in stands of 20 to 55 trees per acre, but in some areas, they now grow in densities of 300 to 900 trees per acre. The unnatural density allowed what were formerly isolated pockets of insect infestations to morph into massive infestations killing large swaths of forests. There are now more dead trees in many federal forests than live ones, drying out and becoming growing stockpile of fuel for wildfires. Indeed, the U.S. Forest Service estimates more than 190 million acres of public land, almost all of it in the arid west, are at risk of catastrophic fires.

There’s a whole generation
With a new explanation

In addition to the mountain forests the hillsides above the cities of San Francisco, LA and most others are also overgrown with drought-stricken scrub and half-dead trees, in part due to restrictions on grazing, brush removal, as well as logging. They’re the kindling.

And it’s not just the evil Right Wing of the Heritage Foundation that’s pointing this out. Here’s The Guardian:

As part of a project to study California’s fire history, we sampled almost 2,000 fire-scarred trees and stumps in the Sierra Nevada. What was equally arresting as finding 10 or more scars in a single tree, however, is what we did not find. Of the hundreds of living trees we sampled, only a handful had even a single fire scar in the 20th century. 

Naturally, because it’s the Grundian, there’s shout-outs to Global Warming and the genius fire management of indigenous peoples, but the key point is not denied and it’s not just current science but history telling the tale:

… a 2007 paper in the journal Forest Ecology and Management found prior to European colonization in the 1800s, more than 4.4 million acres of California forest and shrub-land burned annually, far more than the area of California that has burned since 2000, which ranges from 90,000 acres to 1,590,000 acres per year.

But even though wildfires have declined over all in the USA (and around the world), in California 10 of the state’s 20 largest, most deadly fires ever occurred in the last decade.

To make things worse California’s leaders, instead of admitting they got it wrong, have actually been using the wildfires of recent years as an excuse to go even crazier on the environmental front, via blaming the fires on AGW.

It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. They warn of cataclysmic climate change if we don’t suddenly remove the fossil fuel energy on which their state (and the Western world) built its modern, prosperous, comfortable lifestyle. Then they work against any sensible management of California’s forests that would reduce the severity of routine regular wildfires. Then, when the wildfires become record-breaking conflagrations, they point and say, “See, I told you so.”

They’re like arsonists admiring their handiwork from afar.

Just one other example of how these political and media “environmentalists” don’t understand the environment is shown in how they shed tears about the terrible fires destroying the great redwood forests:

“Hundreds of trees burned at Big Basin Redwoods State Park,” reported Shawn Hubler and Kellen Browning for The New York Times. “Park officials closed it on Wednesday, another casualty of the wildfires that have wracked the state with a vengeance that has grown more apocalyptic every year.”

“The protected trees, some 2,500 years old, were nearly wiped out by loggers in the 1800s,” claimed CBS News’ Jonathan Vigliotti. “Now human-caused climate change has damaged or destroyed many of these ancient giants.”

Except that these old-growth redwood forests need fire to survive and thrive. Heat from fire is required for the release and germination of redwood seeds, and to burn up the woody debris on the forest floor. The trees themselves survive – as long as the fires are of normal, historic scale, rather than monsters fueled by the stupidity of environmentalists:

“I see [the current California fires] as a normal event, just not one that happens every year,” Jon Keeley, a leading forest scientist, told me. “On July 30, 2008, we had massive fires throughout northern California due to a series of lightning fires in the middle of the summer,” he said. “It’s not an annual event, but it’s not an unusual event.”

“The idea that fire is somehow new,” said geographer Paul Robbins of the University of Wisconsin, “a product solely of climate change, and part of a moral crusade for the soul of the nation, borders on the insane.” 

The cherry on top is that despite all this sturm and drang, California’s GHG emissions over the past decade have fallen less than 39 other states.

Coastal California is hilly, difficult to build on, and prone to devastating earthquakes. It is semi-arid, without much of an aquifer. The watershed of the Sierra Nevadas is more than 200 miles away. In other words, some of the people most eager to offer green sermons to others live in one of the most artificial and ecologically fragile environments on the planet, and they’ve been managing it very poorly even as they’ve shouted their own praises from the rooftops.

On his final day in office in January 2019, California Governor Jerry Brown admitted as much by quietly signing bills removing impediments to “controlled burns” and allotting $190 million a year to “improve forest health and fire prevention.” Whether this is followed up by enough practical action to slow down the monster fires is yet another question since the state increasingly can’t seem to accomplish anything.

Written by Tom Hunter

May 22, 2021 at 9:43 am

Another argument that is no longer off-limits

One of the detailed points of argument during the Great Chinese Lung Rot pandemic was around the definition of what actually constituted a Covid-19 death.

Early in the hysteria it was pointed out that deaths were being recorded as Covid simply because the patient had tested positive for Covid. This included even ridiculous examples such as deaths by car accident.

Naturally the pro-hysteria side, with the aid of the “If It Bleeds, It Leads” MSM, ferociously attacked such arguments. For the MSM it’s quite natural that the more death there is the better the story. That’s been true since the days of William Randolph Hearst and his famous “Sob Sisters” over a hundred years ago.

But even the medical “experts” had motive to push death numbers higher, since the more death there was the more likely they could persuade politicians and The People to undertake the extremist controls they advocated. Some of this was obvious with the pandemic models pushed by the likes of Neil Ferguson (“A spherical cow of uniform density in a frictionless vacuum“).

Naturally their counter-attacks against such critics focused on how you should not argue with medical experts, even though medical experts were among the critics of the Covid-death classifications. The motivations of the likes of Ferguson and company were not to be questioned, only those of their dastardly and uncaring opponents.

My, how things change when the motivations run the other way. In this case the criticism around deaths of people who have been vaccinated for Covid-19. Placed under such pressure, no less than the head of American Center for Disease Control (CDC) backs into …. the precise arguments put forward by critics of the Covid death counters.

Walensky is drawing a distinction between those who died directly because they got COVID and those who may have tested positive, but ultimately died of another comorbidity or condition. Now, to most people, that would seem like common sense. After all, why would you count someone with terminal cancer or an already failing heart as a COVID death – just because they had the virus when they died?

Obviously, what Walensky is saying is true. What we’ve known about COVID from early on from those hit the hardest told us that co-morbidities, including heart problems, lung problems, and morbid obesity, are the top factors, and that very old people (70+) naturally suffered more from the first two factors, hence them suffering a higher Covid-19 death rate than other age groups. If someone is otherwise terminally sick, even a mild case of Covid-19 could expedite matters – just as the Flu or Pneumonia normally does. The latter has long been called the “Old People’s Friend” for that very reason.

But the real point I want made clear here is that what Walensky is saying has previously been declared to be completely off-limits for over a year by the powers that be. In fact, it’s the kind of thing that has often gotten right wing-leaning sites in trouble with the social media censors of FaceTwit and company.

Yet, here is the Biden administration saying what was previously labeled as taboo, just because it now fits their narrative, which is driven by the motivation to reduce the death count rather than increase it because the latter would blow up the vaccination programmes. Meanwhile, the media don’t question it, and the social media overlords just shrug.

Oh, and the CDC has recently and rapidly shifted their positions on masks. Because Science.

The North Face: an outstanding company

I don’t think I own any North Face gear, or ever have, though I do think their line of outdoor clothing is stylish.

Apparently the company likes stylish things across the board, especially those which let its customers know that it cares about more than just profits, but the Earth itself:

Innovex is based in Houston and has nearly 100 workers in the Permian Basin.

Each year, the company gets a Christmas gift for its employees. This year, it was supposed to be a North Face jacket with an Innovex logo, a company Innovex has ordered gear from in the past.

The company providing the jackets said The North Face doesn’t want to support the oil and gas industry in the same way they’d reject the porn industry or tobacco industry.

“They told us we did not meet their brand standards,” Innovex CEO Anderson said. “We were separately informed that what that really meant is was that we were an oil and gas company.”

[North Face said that it] “thoroughly investigates product requests to ensure they align closely with our goals and commitments surrounding sustainability and environmental protection.”

Take that you disgusting, Global Warming, despoilers of Gaia! Begone from our customer’s ranks! No more will our skiers have to be ashamed at wearing the same clothes as some deplorable oil driller. Virtue and purity hath returned to our world.

Unfortunately for North Face their management turned out to be pretty ignorant about their own products and it didn’t take long for somebody in the fossil fuel industry to strike back – but in an unexpected way:

The Colorado Oil and Gas Association has bestowed its first-ever “Extraordinary Customer Award” on The North Face, saying it appreciates the company for its abundant use of oil and gas.

“To have such a large percent of what they make, probably three-quarters of the mass they ship is actually our product. So, it’s hard to top the all-in nature of The North Face as a consumer of our product,” said Chris Wright, CEO of Liberty Oilfield Services.

Fantastic stuff and now a US state government, Louisiana, has made it official with a resolution passed last week, that recognized The North Face as an “extraordinary customer” of “the Louisiana oil and gas petrochemical industries.”

The resolution highlights the “symbiotic relationship between the Louisiana oil and gas and petrochemical industry and The North Face,” commending the clothing company for “utilizing vital oil and gas resources so important to our state.”

“The North Face continues to offer a comprehensive collection of high-performance outerwear, skiwear, backpacks, duffels, and footwear made with nylon, polyester, and polyurethane, all of which come from petroleum products,” the resolution reads.

Congratulations to The North Face for these well-deserved awards.

In fact I’m so pleased about this that I think I shall go and buy a new ski jacket, and while looking at the products in the store I shall certainly offer voluble and effusive commentary in commending them on their wonderfully high use of fossil fuels.

I’m sure their sales people and customers will also be pleased with my visit.

Written by Tom Hunter

May 14, 2021 at 11:05 am

The Power of Glamour

I’m shamelessly using the title of this book, which I would recommend you read even if you can’t stand the fashion industry- perhaps especially if you can’t stand it.

For the simple fact is that our societies are driven as much by these ephemeral things as by the literal nuts, bolts and electronics of our technological world.

From vacation brochures to military recruiting ads, from the Chrysler Building to the iPad, from political utopias to action heroines, Postrel argues that glamour is a seductive cultural force. Its magic stretches beyond the stereotypical spheres of fashion or film, influencing our decisions about what to buy, where to live, which careers to pursue, where to invest, and how to vote.

The post I put up the other day on cleverly painted water towers reminded me of a couple of other such things that I’ve come across recently.

First up is the emergence of a very rare turbine-powered Chrysler car from the 1960’s.

The 1963 Chrysler Turbine Car was one of 55 that were built to evaluate the use of turbine engines as part of an automobile powertrain and given to real-world drivers for short loans.

The thought was that a relatively simple, smooth operating engine that could run on a variety of fuels would offer a reliable and efficient alternative to piston engines, but poor emissions and fuel economy doomed it to the history books after a couple of years of testing.

All but nine of the cars were sent to the crusher after the project was complete in 1966. Chrysler kept two, five were sent to museums and two ended up in private hands.

Not surprisingly, car nut, Jay Leno, (former host of The Tonight Show back when it had mass appeal) owns one, but the second privately owned one is back on the market for the first time in decades.

It looks very cool on these shots although if you click on the link you’ll see that the front view is not so great: obviously YMMV. But the inside is just gorgeous, right down to the “turbine look” in the centre console.

As crazy as it might have sounded originally, turbines have been used to power other machines, perhaps most notably the US Abrams Tank.

It’s no coincidence that Chrysler was the original manufacturer of the Abrams.

Despite turbines only really being effective when they’re running at constant speed the big advantage is that they can burn any fuel, which was one inspiration for the turbine car. But as the article notes, they’re fuel hogs. The Abrams uses 10 gallons (38 litres) just to start up and the same per hour when idling.

I suppose there are people – likely military people – who find the Abrams glamorous.

The other piece on this subject that I ran across arose from a criticism by Senator Cruz of the Harris-Biden Administration’s decision to rejoin the Paris Climate Accords. Cruz said that they cared more about the people of Paris than Pittsburgh.

It’s the usual soundbite alliteration beloved by politicians and it rather annoyed right-wing writer Claire Berlinski (There Is No Alternative: Why Margaret Thatcher Matters), who lives in Paris and took Cruz to task for his populist shout-out:

An American writer named James Lileks, who lives in the Mid-West, acknowledges what Cruz was doing but then gently points out to Berlinski that there are two cities called Paris; the one she loves and defends and …. the newer Paris.

I’m sure there’s some lovely modern architecture in Paris. Few people go to Paris to seek it out. Only the die-hard architectural masochists feel required to make a pilgrimage to the Pompideu HVAC Museum:

I recall reading all the gushing guff published in the 1980’s when this thing was opened: about its “challenging”, “shocking” and (of course) “revolutionary” design. People go to see what’s inside, where it’s not at all like this. But they don’t go to admire the building.

Then there’s the Mitterand Library. The four buildings stand like open books, which is nice. They have a serene, spare quality, and also would not be out of place as the HQ for the advanced species that has colonized earth, eliminated 92% of the population, and now rules with a gentle hand because the survivors know the death rays strike without warning or sound.

Which brings me to this Paris concert hall, and the idea of Europe as synonymous with Grandeur And Splendor Which True Murcans Must Reject.

Do you get the sense of some alien creature blindly advancing on the city, its tentacles dripping with silvery ichor?

Of course it’s likely that there are people who do find these structures glamorous, in the same manner of an Abrams Tank.

Lileks finishes up his piece by pointing out what such things may mean for French society, in the context of Berlinski’s remark about what Cruz’s remarks mean for American society:

She’s right about Paris being the seat of arts and culture. Paris is beautiful, but its beauty is an artifact of its past.

Which brings me back to the idea Claire expressed: the sentiments she gleaned from the remark about the values of the Parisian elect “are not the mark of a healthy and self-confident society.” I think one could say the same about the structure above. It doesn’t just reject the norms and forms of history; it erases them and insists they never were.

Perhaps these are the marks of a society that loathes itself – either for what it was, which it feels was characterized by iniquities and inequities, or for what it is, which is not as great as it used to be when we were awesome. The contradiction can drive one barmy.

You can’t unmoor Parisians from the past, but you can dissolve the bonds that carry the past into the future. The city becomes a bustling pretty crypt, full of altars to gods no one believes in.

What’s left as a belief system? Statism, Art – which is either ancestor worship or institutionally “disruptive” modernism – and the notion of the Perfected Future, in which men in suits and their severe but glamorous wives go to structures like the one above and sit through a twelve-tone opera with a blank face

Written by Tom Hunter

May 13, 2021 at 11:36 am

Posted in Art, Europe, History, Humour, Ideologues, Technology, USA

Tagged with