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Double Standards & Changing Narratives

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Just another in an endless list of examples of how the narratives change depending on who is in power and what objectives they’re pursuing.

The focus here being on Australia, which continues its descent into Stasi-world.

Let’s start with stuff in New South Wales, whose State government I have been assured is a “Liberal” one with more of a “hands-off” policy than all those nasty socialists…

… followed by the real McCoy in Socialist Victoria.

Plus a bit of phone app tracking of you in South Australia where you get 15 minutes to prove to the government that you are where you say you are.

Culminating in scenes like this – because even after two burly cops have smashed a 70 year old woman to the ground and broken her hip you still need to pepper spray the fuck out of her. Just to be safe. She might have Covid-19.

It’s entirely predictable where the MSM will sit on this issue. As this compare and contrast does of the Guardian’s approach to two similar events with different bad guys.

Flashback: how “Public Health advocates” felt about protests during lockdowns in 2020 America (same here in NZ incidentally)

Thus, you can guarantee which photo the likes of The Guardian would support below.

It’s almost time to start playing that game Papers Please to get into shape for the questions.

Having had numerous people in the US talking about denying healthcare to unvaccinated folk, don’t be surprised if it also becomes more than talk.

Finally, a timetable for comparison. Readers can pick where New Zealand sits on this chart – and where we’re headed over time.

Angelo Codevilla on our Ruling Class

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He was killed by a drunk driver a few days ago while walking along a footpath. He was 78 and had just recovered from Covid-19.

Life eh?

You’ve probably never heard of the man. I had not until 2010 when he wrote a seminal article, America’s Ruling Class. But he had quite a background, outlined here, as a keen critic of the Pentagon and a progenitor of the Strategic Defense Initiative that Reagan pushed.

Among his many fine books are a translation of Machiavelli’s Prince, and several books on war, strategy, and intelligence that hold up very well even at a remove of 30 years in some cases. Especially recommended is his book The Character of Nations, which holds up very well because it draws upon vast historical learning that never goes out of style. His co-authored book with Paul Seabury, War: Ends and Means, is also a fantastic primer on how to take warfare seriously. And his book on intelligence, Informing Statecraft, is also a classic that can be read to great use today, because it was less about transient facts such as the Soviet Union and more about the defective culture of our “intelligence” community.

A learned but practical man then, not ignorant of politics and bureaucracy.

But back to that 2010 article, which I strongly urge you to read in light of all that has happened since. For me these are the key excerpts:

As over-leveraged investment houses began to fail in September 2008, the leaders of the Republican and Democratic parties, of major corporations, and opinion leaders stretching from the National Review magazine (and the Wall Street Journal) on the right to the Nation magazine on the left, agreed that spending some $700 billion to buy the investors’ “toxic assets” was the only alternative to the U.S. economy’s “systemic collapse.” In this, President George W. Bush and his would-be Republican successor John McCain agreed with the Democratic candidate, Barack Obama. Many, if not most, people around them also agreed upon the eventual commitment of some 10 trillion nonexistent dollars in ways unprecedented in America. They explained neither the difference between the assets’ nominal and real values, nor precisely why letting the market find the latter would collapse America. 

Fear! The strange thing is that it was the MSM, with their usual addiction to fear pornography, plus many other political and “thought” leaders who seemed to be more frightened than the public. Moreover, when the time came to shove money at the banks, a number of the largest objected, for the simple and sound reason that they weren’t the ones who had indulged in the CDO insanity and were not in trouble. But the collective won out.

The public objected immediately, by margins of three or four to one. When this majority discovered that virtually no one in a position of power in either party or with a national voice would take their objections seriously, that decisions about their money were being made in bipartisan backroom deals with interested parties, and that the laws on these matters were being voted by people who had not read them, the term “political class” came into use. 

Then, after those in power changed their plans from buying toxic assets to buying up equity in banks and major industries but refused to explain why, when they reasserted their right to decide ad hoc on these and so many other matters, supposing them to be beyond the general public’s understanding, the American people started referring to those in and around government as the “ruling class.”

And in fact Republican and Democratic office holders and their retinues show a similar presumption to dominate and fewer differences in tastes, habits, opinions, and sources of income among one another than between both and the rest of the country. They think, look, and act as a class.

He makes it clear that the Republican’s “pivot” on some of these things was meaningless partisanship:

Although after the election of 2008 most Republican office holders argued against the Troubled Asset Relief Program, against the subsequent bailouts of the auto industry, against the several “stimulus” bills and further summary expansions of government power to benefit clients of government at the expense of ordinary citizens, the American people had every reason to believe that many Republican politicians were doing so simply by the logic of partisan opposition. After all, Republicans had been happy enough to approve of similar things under Republican administrations. Differences between Bushes, Clintons, and Obamas are of degree, not kind.

No prominent Republican challenged the ruling class’s continued claim of superior insight, nor its denigration of the American people as irritable children who must learn their place. The Republican Party did not disparage the ruling class, because most of its officials are or would like to be part of it.

But it is the following passages that are the key point about this new class, which increasingly apply across the Western democracies, and which lead to things like this, and this from our “leaders”. Codevilla contrasts the past American rulers with those of today:

Never has there been so little diversity within America’s upper crust. Always, in America as elsewhere, some people have been wealthier and more powerful than others. But until our own time America’s upper crust was a mixture of people who had gained prominence in a variety of ways, who drew their money and status from different sources and were not predictably of one mind on any given matter. The Boston Brahmins, the New York financiers, the land barons of California, Texas, and Florida, the industrialists of Pittsburgh, the Southern aristocracy, and the hardscrabble politicians who made it big in Chicago or Memphis had little contact with one another. Few had much contact with government, and “bureaucrat” was a dirty word for all. So was “social engineering.” Nor had the schools and universities that formed yesterday’s upper crust imposed a single orthodoxy about the origins of man, about American history, and about how America should be governed.

Actual diversity then, even within the ranks of the wealthy and powerful.

All that has changed. Today’s ruling class, from Boston to San Diego, was formed by an educational system that exposed them to the same ideas and gave them remarkably uniform guidance, as well as tastes and habits. These amount to a social canon of judgments about good and evil, complete with secular sacred history, sins (against minorities and the environment), and saints. Using the right words and avoiding the wrong ones when referring to such matters — speaking the “in” language — serves as a badge of identity. Regardless of what business or profession they are in, their road up included government channels and government money because, as government has grown, its boundary with the rest of American life has become indistinct. Many began their careers in government and leveraged their way into the private sector. Some, e.g., Secretary of the Treasury Timothy Geithner, never held a non-government job. Hence whether formally in government, out of it, or halfway, America’s ruling class speaks the language and has the tastes, habits, and tools of bureaucrats. It rules uneasily over the majority of Americans not oriented to government.

He then contrasts this ruling class with the rest of America:

The two classes have less in common culturally, dislike each other more, and embody ways of life more different from one another than did the 19th century’s Northerners and Southerners — nearly all of whom, as Lincoln reminded them, “prayed to the same God.” By contrast, while most Americans pray to the God “who created and doth sustain us,” our ruling class prays to itself as “saviors of the planet” and improvers of humanity. Our classes’ clash is over “whose country” America is, over what way of life will prevail, over who is to defer to whom about what. The gravity of such divisions points us, as it did Lincoln, to Mark’s Gospel: “if a house be divided against itself, that house cannot stand.”

See also:

The Hunger Masks
Do as I say, not as I do
Generational Toxicity
A second American Civil War

Written by Tom Hunter

September 23, 2021 at 12:35 pm

The Hunger Masks

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“They were careless people, Tom and Daisy—they smashed up things and . . . then retreated back into their money . . . and let other people clean up the mess they had made.”

I don’t know how many of our readers are aware of a famous and very successful series of books and movies from the last decade called The Hunger Games.

They’re SF stories set in a dystopian future where glittering technology exists in a feudal society. In fact that technology enables it. For the purposes of this post the following is a key plotline:

[The Hunger Games] universe is a dystopia set in Panem, a North American country consisting of the wealthy Capitol and 13 districts in varying states of poverty. Every year, children from the first 12 districts are selected via lottery to participate in a compulsory televised battle royale death match called The Hunger Games.

Capitol citizens are extremely wealthy and life moves very slowly until the Games,… Many Capitol residents are extremely shallow, always looking for ways to be noticed. An outrageous sense of style and fashion are very important to the citizens of the Capitol… Capitol citizens are noted to have quite high ranking and integral roles and occupations for Panem as a whole…

You get the picture.

While not quite as gaudy as those characters, the following is a great example of how the same attitudes are rampant among our rulers nowadays, as San Francisco Mayor London Breed, had fun the other day in a San Francisco nightclub. I guess she’s read some of these counter-narrative articles on masks.

What she’s actually doing in that video is announcing the new law that you do not have to wear a mask if:

  1.  You are “having a good time,”
  2. “Feeling the spirit,”
  3. Watching the reunion of a band you like.

BTW, she insists that the reunion of the jazz band, Tony Toni Tone, is the story here, and not her defying her own mask mandate. I especially loved this quote:

“We don’t need the fun police to come in and micromanage and tell us what we should or shouldn’t be doing,” she said during an interview, contending she was drinking at the time and started dancing because she was “feeling the spirit” and “wasn’t thinking about a mask,” according to reports.

The irony in that statement is so fucking thick you could cut it with a knife.

Perhaps SF citizens should keep that in mind if an actual cop (very much not “fun”) or some other asshole hassles them about wearing a mask. Maybe print out her interview answers on a card to show cops that the law has been repealed by the mayor herself.

This is nothing new of course, for in the past year the following has occurred:

California Governor Newsom at a lovely dinner with other unmasked rich people at one of the world’s most expensive restaurants, the French Laundry. The staff are masked of course, per order of the Governor.

Barack Obama’s 60th birthday unmasked bash with his celebrity friends at their home in Martha’s Vineyard. The servants wore masks.

Obama’s Party

Nancy Pelosi’s fundraiser in the expensive vine yards of California. The servants wore masks.

And of course, the Met Ball a few days ago.

These people either don’t believe their own bullshit about masks (and other things) or they’re glorying in applying those rules to little people who can’t fight back, at least not without ending up in jail.

Or perhaps what we Untermenchen should take from all these events is that they’re just deliberately rubbing our noses in this shit. That the whole point is to make it clear who the boss is: that the rules apply to us, not them, and they want us to know it.

We are ruled by terrible, unkind, incompetent, uncaring people. I’m tempted to say that they are evil people, not out of deliberation but shallow callousness.

Generational Toxicity

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Over on the Bowalley Road blog Chris Trotter has really been letting the words flow wildly in relation to the news of the AUKUS pact that has been announced, with two articles in one week on the subject.

They’re the usual combination of themes one would expect from his Lefty age group: pro-China, anti-US, anti-nuclear, fears of a new Cold War, fears of NZ getting sucked back into another “Anglo Saxon Imperialist” world and so forth.

But it was actually this passage that intrigued me:

It is also quite possible that, by 2023, the United States will be embroiled in domestic strife bordering on civil-war. 

Followed by a lot of ignorant guff about the USA and the Republican Party. Now I’m not averse to the arguments about a possible second Civil War in the USA: it’s increasingly being discussed in non-fringe circles on both the American Left and Right. Even in popular culture I saw the “comedian” Sarah Silverman talking the other day about the nation splitting up because Democrat and Republican voters increasingly cannot stand dealing with eachother.

But there’s another aspect of this that should be taken account of: the growing war between the generations. Specifically between the Baby Boomers and … every other generation: Gen-X, Millennials and Gen-Z. Admittedly this more of a US thing than elsewhere: I don’t think NZ Baby Boomers ever fitted the label of being the “Me Generation” after Tom Wolfe’s famous 1976 article.

I’ve already covered some of this in two posts, Ok Boomer and Hand over the $35 trillion, you old fart, but a recent article by a Baby Boomer in the New York Post should be more of an eye-opener for Boomers, Millennials’ extreme hatred for Baby Boomers is totally unjustified:

Baby boomers who cried “Don’t Trust Anyone Over 30” during the Vietnam War should be scared to death of millennials. Because, at least among the Twitterati, they hate us — they really, really hate us.

Last week I took a beating from younger readers over an essay I wrote lamenting the decline of the “power lunch.” Although it only partly blamed the phenomenon on millennial habits — e.g., preferring avocado and kale to beef and baked potatoes — hundreds of thousands on Twitter either posted or retweeted such insults as “Old man yells at lunch table” (I’m 69), “What’s it like to be an antique?” and “We’re the ones doing the actual lunches while you’re having three-martini lunches.”

Millennials (and to some extent their Gen-X and Gen-Z brethren) hate their elders with a ferocity never before seen in our culture.

Generation gaps will always be with us. Historian Marc Wortman found a generational split over sending young men off to war way back in 1941. But unlike those of us who came of age in the 1960s-early 1970s, who merely disapproved of our elders’ “colonialist” wars and shag rugs, millennials (born between 1980-1994) can’t stand the air we boomers breathe.

Young hippies outdoors.

To some extent? This guy should go to some of the chat areas of Reddit and other non-FaceTwit Social Media.

He’ll quickly discover that Gen-Z are right up there on bringing the hate and Gen-X even more so given their proximity in time. Few things piss off X’rs more than being pegged as Boomers by being born in the 1960’s, as if we remember Woodstock and “Free Love”.

Unfortunately the article then delves into the reasons why and thus demonstrates even more how Boomers just don’t get it.

But if they spent more time studying actual history, which can’t easily be found on iPhones, they’d know that boomers were, and remain, the most socially and environmentally conscious generation America ever has ever known.

FFS. He thinks this is because of Greta Thunderhead and her influence on 16 year olds re Climate Charge.

Oh no, dear fellow, there’s a lot more to it than that. There’s only one sentence where he alludes to just one thing stemming from that wonderful “socially conscious” generation:

Maybe too much so — our universities’ overwhelmingly “progressive” agendas originated in the 1960s and have become more dominant ever since.

That’s because the Boomers who were the radical students of the late 60’s/early 70’s now dominate those universities as professors and administrators, and are hard at work teaching the next generations the same stuff, without any opposing arguments or ideas.

Being “the most socially and environmentally conscious generation America ever has ever known” isn’t an excuse or a defense, it’s an unwitting confession of guilt.

What this guy and the millions of Boomers like him miss is that this shite has now spread into every other part of the USA: the MSM, entertainment, government, bureaucracies and even corporates and the military.

I know of no American member of the younger generations who thinks that Social Security or Medicare/Medicaid will be there for them in their dotage of the late 21st century. Or a military that can actually win a war either. Not to mention housing costs, energy costs, career progression, jobs in general or the chance of getting married and raising a family because it’s so bloody expensive in more ways than just dollars.

What he also misses is that these younger generations, or at least a good chunk of them, might be objecting to having had these institutions trashed by the ideas of a generation that aggressively devalued the traditional things on which they rested, even as there are members of Gen-X/Millennial that have learned from their forebears and joined in with the trashing, as this guy points out:

As a college professor for over 35 years, I’ve gotten to know three generations of students: Gen X (born between 1965 and 1980), the Millennials (1981-1996), and now Gen Z (1997-2012). And because I teach rhetoric, I’ve read thousands of their papers, providing substantial insight into the way they think.

In general, however, I found that Millennials presented unique challenges. They were, as a group, the most entitled, judgmental, and arrogant of all the students I’ve taught, often basing an inflated sense of self-importance on scanty evidence.

Essentially, they are the “participation trophy” generation, the unwitting victims of countless artificial “self-esteem building” experiments by the education establishment, not to mention their own parents.

Ouch. But there is hope:

There is another generation of bright young people — Gen Z — following right on their heels and therein may lie our temporal salvation.

In comparison to their Millennial predecessors, my Gen Z students tend to be more open-minded, more interested in facts and logic, more inclined to question the status quo…

That partially explains the Fuck Joe Biden chants that have swept across college football stadiums in the last few weeks and even spread to the Yankees-Mets game in NYC of all places.

They also take a more nuanced view of history and are inherently distrustful of ideologues on either side. 

Let’s hope so, and that inheritances will add up to avoiding a different type of American Civil War.

Written by Tom Hunter

September 21, 2021 at 1:09 pm

Australian Submarine Strategy

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Richard Fernandez is one of the very interesting writers over on the PJ Media site, focusing on matters of foreign policy, military and science in general. He also writes for a number of other publications.

The recent announcement of the AUKUS partnership saw him reaching into the past to grab an article that he wrote in 2013 but never published, Strategy and Submarines. It takes a detailed look not just at what Australia wanted to do with submarines but what they might have to do, as well as the technology itself.

Once the purpose is determined, then the correct tools can be chosen for the job. Thus, every acquisition must be viewed in the context of “what is it for”. Unless the ends are defined, nothing can be said about the proposed means. Buying naval vessels is a means to an end. The determination of ends is usually called strategy.  Unfortunately, the goals of Australian naval strategy are sometimes presented as a laundry list.

He points out that the problem with laundry lists is you cannot tell which is most important. There’s also the fact that global security changed rapidly, as he shows with links to Defence White Papers from 1976 (India, China and Japan pose no future security issue), and 2000 where, in the wake of the collapse of the USSR things looked comfortable and it was possible to imagine that Australia could go it alone.

What to do now (2013):

The choice of ends has a very definite effect upon the means. To defend Australia against powerful opponents “without relying on help from the combat forces of any other country” logically implies the adoption of the naval strategy of the weaker power.

Which is how they ended up with Collins Class submarines and then the deal for the French DIesel-Electric boats. They’re quiet boats but smaller and slower than the American SSN’s, which puts them at odds with the supposed new goals of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN):

But the lack of a definite strategic choice has given the submarine requirements a Jekyll and Hyde character. On the one hand, the conventional Collins-class boats are the stereotypical weapon of the weaker power, the 21st century equivalent of the submarine and naval mine, combining the mobility of a World War II sub with the quietness of a hole in the ocean. On the other hand, many of the envisioned RAN missions implicitly require cooperation with the United States and hence governed by the strategy of the dominant power.

There’s some very interesting stuff on the history of mines and other such “weaker power” stuff, including the WWII aerial mining of Japan which “In terms of damage per unit of cost, surpassed strategic bombing and the United States submarine campaign.” It was called Operation Starvation, which potential horror should be contrasted against military invasions and atomic bombs.

There’s a lot of detailed analysis of Air Independent Propulsion (AIP) submarines which, as good as they can be, run into problems when they are detected, as well as other issues:

AIP units often generate only as much power as a family sedan so that even banks of four produce 300 kw compared to the 30,000 kw of a Virginia class SSN. With that small output, the subs are limited to creeping along at about 2 or 3 knots.

That may be of little consequence in European scenarios, where submarines must only transit a short way to station before turning off their diesels and activating the AIP. But slow speed and the small hull sizes of European off-the-shelf subs are a bane for countries like Australia and Israel, which must send their subs great distances in what are essentially modified European coastal submarines.

The detection scenario can’t be dismissed as technology improves. The article goes into some detail about robotic submarines (unmanned underwater vehicles or UUVs) ) and how advanced they had become even by 2011. Small, cheap and plentiful they present a strong potential threat to small, stealthy submarines that just sit around in shallow waters waiting for targets. UUVs also will be networked together to form a sensor net across oceans, rather like the static SOSUS net the US used in the Atlantic during the Cold War, except this one is mobile.

Some versions called an Autonomous Undersea Vehicles (AUV and also dubbed “gliders”) are specifically designed to track conventional, stealthy submarines.

Liberdade class flying wings are autonomous underwater gliders developed by the US Navy Office of Naval Research which use a blended wing body hullform to achieve hydrodynamic efficiency. It is an experimental class whose models were originally intended to track quiet diesel electric submarines in littoral waters, move at 1–3 knots and remain on station for up to six months.

You can see why the Aussies started to have second thoughts about their $93 billion French purchase, even aside from all the production problems. There’s also another aspect of the future to be considered:

Given the increasing number of complex computerised systems being operated by modern submarines, another important concept is a submarine’s ‘hotel load.’ As SSGs are limited by the power stored in their batteries (which can only be recharged by surfacing), they strictly ration power among their systems.

SSNs are capable of generating and sustaining a much greater power output while submerged due to their nuclear reactor. This power output allows SSNs to carry a greater number of far more powerful sensors and systems (which increase sensor range and awareness), greatly increasing the flexibility, stealth and usefulness of SSNs.

As he puts it himself, his old analysis actually indicates how Australia has made this decision now. Although he didn’t make that forecast he pointed out the strategic thinking needed to make the decision, and it looks the Aussies went through that same process.

We had deep and grave concerns that the capability being delivered by the Attack-class submarine was not going to meet our strategic interests and we had made very clear that we would be making a decision based on our strategic national interest. – Scott Morrison

Written by Tom Hunter

September 21, 2021 at 8:24 am

The Bitcoin House

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Read an interesting article today on the news out of the USA that some 30% of men are not employed in that nation.

What was unusual about the article was that it decided to ignore the usual angle of exploring why this is the case, instead focusing on how all these millions of American men actually live without a job.

One section looked at investments and aside from a doubling in retail stock market investment accounts there was also this:

Now crypto. You can laugh all you want, but the simple fact is that the price of bitcoin is up from $4,861 on March 12, 2000 to $47,763 today, or basically up 10X, (and remember it even hit $64,888.99 this spring).

Hmmmm. That’s an annual increase of 11.49% per year over twenty one years. Not bad.

The other day I checked out what our house is worth and was shocked and appalled to find out how much it’s increased in value in just the last year.

I’ve known for some years now how crazy things have been with NZ housing. I’ve been saying for a decade that this could not go on. Yet it has and although I thought I knew how crazy it has become I was still under-estimating the insanity.

Moreover when I ran the numbers over time I saw that our “investment” in house has increased by 11% per year on average for twenty years.

Written by Tom Hunter

September 19, 2021 at 5:23 pm

Xinese Xi Snot Graphing

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It’s been a while since I looked at the progress around the world against Xi Jinping’s bastard child experiment.

Here’s a comparison I’ve not seen before: Israel vs Sweden.

South Korea with yet another demonstration of how masks don’t work against this virus and never have.

Comparisons within the USA.

Here’s a fun one. Try to guess which state out of these two had the tougher policies on social distancing, lockdowns, masks, vaccinations and other policies over the past eighteen months.

Getting away from all those messy continental borders that can’t be completely sealed, here’s the good old island state of Hawaii again, from just over a month ago.

Obviously all these measures need to be tested to destruction.

Written by Tom Hunter

September 19, 2021 at 10:00 am

This is why Generals don’t do Foreign Policy

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The other day I did a post on General Milley’s breach of the US military chain of command and interference in US foreign policy in the waning days of the Trump Administration, Seven Days in January: why General Milley must resign.

Because of the incredibly toxic politicisation of every aspect of life in the USA, this breach has been condemned only by retired military officers and the Republican Party. The Democrats apparently see no problem with something that they have always supposedly been in terror of for decades – the military ignoring or going outside the civilian chain of command.

President “Softserve” Biden apparently has no issue with Milley, presumably because he can’t imagine a situation where a Milley might pull the same stunt on him. Biden is completely fine with his constitutional powers being usurped. If Milley sought to substitute his judgment for that of Trump, what stops him from doing the same thing with Biden? Yet, Biden professes not to care, which shows Biden’s incompetence, yet again.

But aside from the seriously bad constitutional problems raised by all this inside the USA, there’s also the fact that Milley’s intervention may be having unintentional consequences in foreign policy, even aside from the weakness that Biden has exhibited with the Afghanistan rout.

First of all, here’s Milley’s telephone counterpart in those now-infamous calls, senior General Li Zuocheng, making himself very clear back in May of this year:

Li Zuocheng, chief of the Joint Staff Department and member of the Central Military Commission told Beijing’s Great Hall of the People: ‘If the possibility for peaceful reunification is lost, the people’s armed forces will, with the whole nation, including the people of Taiwan, take all necessary steps to resolutely smash any separatist plots or actions.’

Then on September 9 came this from the editor of China’s state-run media Global Times:

The latest came just the other day from a senior Chinese government official.

Milley’s phonecall should be put into the perspective of this speech he made in 2015:

Perhaps in 2015 I would have agreed with Milley, but they obviously view themselves as the enemy of the USA, otherwise we would not be seeing flexing shit like this. “Friends” don’t address each other the way they are talking to other nations and threatening them, including obviously now the USA.

The theory of deterrence applies not just in the realm of nuclear warfare, but to conventional warfare. Right now, between Biden and his incompetent and deluded Administration, including obviously the senior levels of the Pentagon and intelligence services, China is not being deterred.

They might well fail in a military adventure against Taiwan or in the South China Sea. But stopping them from trying in the first place is perhaps more important, and simply announcing something like the new AUKUS pact, which will not become practicable for perhaps five years, is not be enough.

On that note I did appreciate this pushback. Nice to see there are still Navy boys with a spine.

Written by Tom Hunter

September 19, 2021 at 6:00 am

Posted in China, Military, US Politics, USA

Tagged with

Minaj à trois

with 3 comments

There’s definitely a lot of weird shit going on at the moment around the world.

None weirder than Chinese Xi Snot’s effect on otherwise seemingly normal people, turning them into frightened, fearful souls who have become toxic to friends and family and wear masks on a beach and in parks.

With politicians it’s been quite the opposite: power mad control freaks doesn’t even begin to cover them, almost without exception.

So it should not be a surprise to see pushback coming from unexpected places. Weird places – like Nicki Minaj.

You don’t know who she is? Of course you don’t. Few people over the age of 30 would:

Onika Tanya Maraj-Petty (born December 8, 1982), known professionally as Nicki Minaj, is a Trinidadian-born rapper, singer, and songwriter. She is known for her animated flow in her rapping and versatility as a recording artist.

Minaj is one of the best selling female artists of all time with 100 million records sold worldwide. Her numerous accolades include eight American Music Awards, five MTV Video Music Awards, twelve BET Awards, four Billboard Music Awards, a Brit Award, and a Guinness World RecordBillboard ranked her the top female rapper of the 2010s, as well as ranking her seventh among the top female artists of the decade.

Nicki Minaj

She also has 22 million followers on Twitter and 175 million on Instagram. In other words she’s a very big deal in terms of youth culture. Like other celebrities she talks a lot of shit because attention is like oxygen for these people, while also feeding their vast incomes, which in turn pushes them to being even crazier.

This includes giving health advice, as actress Gwyneth Paltrow has done for years, while also selling vagina-scented candles.

Her vagina to be specific.

You therefore probably don’t want to know about Sandra Bullock’s penis facialswhere Josh Brolin got sunburned, or what’s in the Kardashians’ smoothies. But rest assured that Demi Moore only uses “highly trained medical leeches.

In particular the anti-vaccine movement has been powered for years before now by the likes of Jenny McCarthy, Jim Carrey, Robert Kennedy Jr. and other anti-vaccine activists who were given a welcome platform by Oprah Winfrey, The View (beloved by the Jacinda demographic of women viewers in their 50’s) and other MSM places.

But all of this has usually been treated as an eye-rolling joke by both the Left and the Right, as well as by the government, even when it came to Public Health Care. The attitude was that there will always be a fringe, but they’re not going to have an effect, even with masses of followers.

Until now. The shit storm stated with this Tweet from Minaj.

While I’m no medical expert I really can’t see how an mRNA vaccine would make your testicles swell up as well as causing impotence. But as I said, this is just the usual celebrity bullshit.

The immediate pushback came from fellow media personalities, though nobody with Minaj’s number of followers. There were critical pieces about her at CNNVoxCNBC, the BBC, the American late-night comics made her the butt of their jokes. But it was MSNBC’s Joy Reid, who did a whole segment denouncing Minaj, that really got things going:

Joy Reid

“You have a platform, sister, that is 22 million followers, okay. I have two million followers. You have 22 million followers on Twitter. For you to use your platform to encourage our community to not protect themselves and save their lives, my God, sister, you could do better than that.”

Minaj did not back down. She called Reid a “lying homophobic coon” (Reid has history) and an “Uncle Tomiana”, among other things.

Minaj also revealed that she’s not vaxxed…

The Met was the fancy NYC ball party I posted on the other day, where Lefty hypocrites of all stripes gathered.

So things escalated further. Saint Anthony Fauci felt the need to go on national TV to talk this down. The awesome power of the USA Today and PolitiFact “fact checkers” went into action. Even the Whitehouse reached out, offering a doctor with expertise (not Fauci I presume).

This reaction was beyond belief considering how such people have been ignored by TPTB in the past. But things went even crazier when Tucker Carlson, the Great White Hated of the US Left, covered the story and made the following point :

“The part where she says you should pray on it. Make the decision yourself, like a free human being and “don’t be bullied”. So our media and public health officials didn’t like this because they make their livings bullying people. So they couldn’t let it stand.”

And then she Tweeted out that clip.

MELTDOWN. There was the usual Leftie Tweet Mass Attack that a reference to Carlson invites. But Minaj hit back at those too (in keeping with the rap/hip hop ethos, she fights).

If you’ve wondered why Trump’s 2020 vote share rose among Blacks and Hispanics, this is yet another example.

Minaj has crossed a line that public-health experts, the MSM, and many politicians are enforcing hard around the world. She committed a sin they cannot ignore or forgive, which is to defy them on this issue. It’s been quite a thing watching the spectacle of the entire US medical, MSM, Entertainment (in particular since she’s one of them) and political establishments bringing all of their weight to bear upon her.

That’s because they’re increasingly desperate, so every claim, no matter how spectacularly outlandish and no matter the source, must be policed by our public-health-disinformation watchers, because those gullible masses could be swayed by any blasphemy.

The thing is that’s not going to work. All of these establishment health experts and MSM fact-checkers are putting enormous effort into an attempt to persuade the kinds of people who instinctively reject the recommendations of establishment health experts and barely pay any attention to the MSM.

Beyond such sober reactions, the furious and widespread denunciation and mockery of Minaj will also not have the effect the medical, media, entertainment and political establishments think it will. It may even backfire.

Nicki Minaj is not going to be “canceled.” She’s already fabulously wealthy – she’s worth between $80-100 million – so doesn’t need money. Her fan base of tens of millions, possibly hundreds of millions, isn’t going to abandon her if she maintains a vaccine-sceptical position. She utterly rejects the moral authority of her critics and defiance of what other people think is her brand.

They need to pick another target to crush. Ordinary people should do and judging from results to date, the proles may even like it and want it.

Written by Tom Hunter

September 18, 2021 at 2:30 pm

The skills of ordinary men

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I recently read two articles that actually cover some of the same ground, even though their topics could not be more different.

The first is from 2003, Electric Heroes, and it’s written by a lawyer looking back at one of his early cases where a woman sued an American power company over the death of her husband, who was a linemen.

They clambered up narrow steel ladders and then inched across four-inch-wide “angle-iron” girders made slippery with rain or morning dew, and when they reached out, they touched either the open sky or heavy steel cables whose purpose was to carry enough electricity to power the nation’s fourth largest city.

Because they were so well trained, they were able to work safely, routinely, under conditions that would terrify you or me.

The writer points out that these men (in those days they were all men) were also very careful, which made the case a little strange since this particular linemen had fallen 120 feet to his death or possibly had jumped. Not even his workmates could figure out what had gone wrong.

As the young workhorse lawyer gathering two years of information for the trial, he got to know these men very well.

They had a strong sense of duty, and they had a natural dignity that was boundless.  They were modest men, but they had quiet pride by the mile.  Amongst each other, they were very, very funny.  They cussed a lot, and after work they’d go out together for a beer, or to hunt or play poker or catch an Astros game.  And they stuck up for one another.  You’d think twice about crossing any one of them.

They took the case seriously from the beginning because one of their own had died in their midst, for reasons they couldn’t quite explain or grasp, and they were being accused of having caused his death by their indifference. 

In the end the case was settled out of court and the jury dismissed. The young lawyer had become so bonded with these men that he was incandescent with rage at what he felt his senior lawyers had done to them: as much as admitting that they had been indifferent to their workmate, their friend. But the young partner took him to lunch and, as he saw in hindsight, helped him grow up a bit:

“In the greater scheme of life, are you really furious that Mrs X is getting the fairly modest amount of money that will be left to her after her lawyers’ fees and expenses are extracted?  She’s not getting a huge windfall.  Our client can afford it.  It all goes into the rate-base, and ultimately it will be paid in tiny, tiny increments by all the families for whom Mr X helped keep the lights on during his twelve years with the company. Can you not see the justice in that result, even if it wasn’t the harsh and total victory you were gunning for?”

The second article is very recent and is written by a Captain Charlie Anderson of the Minnesota National Guard, describing their recent expedition to Kabul to extract American and Afghan civilians before the Taliban took over: A few good ‘Bastards’.

It’s a fascinating look at those events from a soldier’s view, but it’s also a good look at a component of the US military that’s often overlooked or disparaged, The National Guard. They’re part-time soldiers although equipped with the same stuff as the regular forces including, in this case, Bradley’s and Abrams tanks. Having said that I was surprised a few years ago to find out from a mate in the NZDF that the Hawaiian Air National Guard flies F-22’s!

But what shows here is that the training is also right up with the regular forces:

We’d practiced and trained for the past two years. The task force did a combat training rotation exercise at Fort Hood, Texas in 2019 and executed a successful rotation (the first post-Covid) at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California in 2020. While drilling at Camp Ripley, Minnesota we completed numerous tabletop exercises and worked the Military Decision Making Process repeatedly until it became muscle memory.

We had executed multiple iterations of gunnery tables and were continuing ongoing missions in Syria, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia. We were confident that as the CENTCOM Regional Response Force we’d be poised and prepared to project military power wherever it was needed to accomplish tactical and strategic goals.

When the time came to move out they were ready to go and got to Kabul promptly. Even so such units still endure scepticism from the regulars:

One captain I met from their brigade intelligence section told me he was under the impression that a senator had pulled some strings and got us deployed from Minnesota. When I told him about our task force and that we were already in the Middle East, postured for such a crisis event, he was speechless. Initially, there was an air of distrust, but we proved ourselves worthy partners, dispelling the myth about the perceived capability gap between the active duty and guard/reserve components. 

It was this paragraph that caught my attention in relation to the first article, as the commander of the unit, Lt. Col. Jake Helgestad, described:

He underscored the life skills the National Guard brought to the 82nd Airborne. “We provided capabilities to the fight beyond trigger-pullers that 1/82 never would’ve been able to — engineers, plumbers, electricians, welders, mechanics, heavy machinery operators – we enabled advanced operations that directly impacted the military’s ability to get people out.” 

No need to call up the US Army Corp of Engineers to build barricades and reinforce walls when you’ve got a bunch of people who do that in their everyday lives.

The article is lengthy but well written and packed with a lot of coal-face detail about what they dealt with in a horrific and rapidly deteriorating situation. Well worth your reading time.

Written by Tom Hunter

September 18, 2021 at 9:54 am