No Minister

Posts Tagged ‘Crime

Another one bites the concrete

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De dunt, dunt, dunt,…. de da da dunt….

If you’ve never seen it, the movie, The Hunt For Red October is excellent, one of the few adaptations of a best selling book that is as good as the original material (accepting the usual limitations and short cuts of Hollywood).

Towards the end of the movie, with all the action done, there’s a funny scene where the Soviet Ambassador – having been part of the original bullshit story about Red October being a threat to the USA in order to get the Yanks to help sink it – has to admit to the US Secretary of Defence another terrible truth, to which the Secretary has only one answer:

And so we come to another edition of my original post..The Mystery of The Dead Russian Oligarchs.

Ex-Putin Ally Plunges to His Death ‘From a Great Height’ at Moscow Aviation Institute:

An aviation expert has become the latest Russian official to fall to his death in mysterious circumstances.

Anatoly Gerashchenko, the former head of Moscow’s Aviation Institute (MAI), died in a mysterious fall inside the institute’s headquarters in the Russian capital on Tuesday.

The organization’s press office released a statement describing the 73-year-old’s death as “the result of an accident,” adding that his untimely demise was a “a colossal loss for the MAI and the scientific and pedagogical community.”

Russian news outlet Izvestia, citing an unnamed source, reported that Gerashchenko “fell from a great height” and careened down several flights of stairs. He was reportedly pronounced dead at the scene.

AYFKM?

Seriously. Can’t we go back to Polonium-210 poisoning? It’s so much more elegant in terms of “You know who did this – and you can’t prove it”

Ok, this is not jumping out of a window but still….

Funnily enough the Soviet Ambassador in that clip is named Andrei.

Hey, I think the lyrics can be easily re-worked.

Written by Tom Hunter

September 22, 2022 at 7:07 pm

What Goes Round

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Adolf predicts law abiding NZ citizens will react to the rising tide of violent crime by re-arming themselves. That’s what’s happening in Australia.

Small business owners will join pistol clubs and just happen to have a loaded 9mm Glock handy when a couple of young black pricks demand the cash from the till.

Only when a dozen of these scrotes have been reduced to room temperature will their mates get the message that death is longer than a life sentence

Written by adolffinkensen

August 8, 2022 at 9:31 pm

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The Gang Problem

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A few years ago, a member of a ‘chiefly’ Ngati Porou family explained to Adolf why there were no gang problems before the White Man turned up.

“You see” she said, “when a young man displayed anti-social behaviour, he was taken aside and told to mend his ways. If his anti-social behaviour continued, he was knocked on the head and eaten.”

So there you go. Traditional justification for shooting the useless bastards.

Written by adolffinkensen

July 26, 2022 at 5:51 pm

Posted in New Zealand

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A Prison Fit For a King Cobra And a Mongrel Mobster

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Just ten miles up the road from Waiouru would be fine.

Written by adolffinkensen

July 1, 2022 at 5:15 pm

Posted in New Zealand

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The Democrat Party is a Clear and Present Danger to the USA

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In Ken Burn’s famous documentary series, The Civil War, one of the voiceovers from the primary narrator – the wonderfully warm, Mid-Western voice of historian David McCullough – describes one of Abraham Lincoln’s dilemmas:

To preserve the Constitution, Lincoln had for three months gone beyond it: waging war without Congressional consent; seizing Northern telegraph offices; suspending habeas corpus. To keep the border states from seceding, Lincoln sent troops to occupy Baltimore and clapped the mayor and 19 secessionist legislators in jail, without trial. Chief Justice Taney ruled that the President had exceeded his power. Lincoln simply ignored him. “More rogues than honest men find shelter under habeas corpus,” he said, and even contemplated arresting the Chief Justice.

Perhaps when the dust has settled on the Jan6 “investigatory” committee and the rest of the hysteria, especially when it’s decommissioned by the incoming GOP majority in November, the Democrats might try and align themselves with Lincoln in this argument as well; that they’ve had to go beyond the norms of law and a democratic society in order to save democracy. Here’s the latest example.

Add this to the arrest a couple of weeks ago of former Trump economic adviser Peter Navarro for refusing to comply with a subpoena from the Democrats’ Jan6 committee. No turn-yourself-in style arrest either but the full monty of FBI handcuffs in public at an airport. By contrast Mr Eastman should be grateful they only took his cellphone, even if they failed to show the warrant first as the law demands.

As that article points out, Obama’s Attorney General, Eric Holder, was held to be in contempt of the House for his refusal to cooperate with an investigation by turning over papers he held. Obama’s “wingman” literally laughed it off, as did Obama’s Director of National Intelligence James Clapper after lying to Congress about them spying on House reps, as did former Obama CIA Director James Brennan for also lying to the House.

Suffice to say that they’re all living the good life and never even saw a search or arrest warrant, let alone a set of handcuffs, FBI agents and a SWAT team, plus an alerted (alerted by who) CNN TV crew to cover their house at 5am for the arrest.

And here is perhaps the worst aspect of this; there is not one Trump opponent, whether private or public, who is willing to call out this ends-determine-the-means evil. They hate Trump that much that they’re willing to bend or break any rules. They literally do not care about democracy or the rule of law even as they scream that they do at the top of their lungs. As President Reagan once said of similar people:

“[They] reserve unto themselves the right to commit any crime, to lie, to cheat and that the only morality they recognize is what will further their cause.”

We expect double standards in politics and “rules for thee but not for me” is pretty much an embedded characteristic of the Left. But the US Democrat Party are pushing it to the edge of civil war (perhaps that’s what they want?) and this is the worst turn of that to date. Which brings me back to Lincoln :

A house divided against itself cannot stand.

No it can’t. This is not going to stop with a devastating election defeat this year or in 2024 but only when an empowered GOP is willing to play by these same rules and forgo the civility bullshit and “We’re better than that” attitudes. Until that happens – until people like the Democrats on this committee and elsewhere are subjected to the same rules they’re imposing on others, and are hurt in professional ways beyond mere voting losses – they will continue to push the boundaries of the norms of democracy and the rule of law in order to gain more power and hold on to it.

Fascism, straight up. Or communism. Take your pick. I’ll go with Claremont’s selection of Beria as the sort of person these Committee members are.

Written by Tom Hunter

June 29, 2022 at 5:27 pm

The beatings will continue until lessons are learned!

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I’m sometimes tempted by the thought that a Labour/Green government should be elected in 2023 so that we can really test all their ideas to destruction.

But then I think of places like 1930’s Germany and 1990’s Venezuela where people voted for ideas they thought would be great for their countries which, filled with easily re-distributed wealth and arts and culture, would be secure against policy mistakes – safe in the knowledge that “There is a great deal of ruin in a nation.”, as Adam Smith once declared to a student.

Over the last few years, in my part of Auckland, there has been a lot of new state housing built; solid 1940’s wooden houses on large sections replaced by six or more modern two-story units. They look nice – so far. There are a lot more cars on the road and a lot more people around. All sorts of people. In the neighbouring suburbs there has been a large jump in all sorts of crime. The ram raids, stabbings and shootings make the news. What doesn’t are the “small” crimes involving teenagers and others being held up by knives or fists in the near-East suburbs.

We were aware of all of this via the local Facebook and Neighbourly websites but it really struck home a couple of months ago when the teenage son of our next door neighbour got punched out while walking home on our quiet streets with his girlfriend from a party late on a Saturday night. Two cars pulled over beside them, several guys jumped out and laid into him. They did at least leave his girlfriend alone even as she called the cops and an ambulance, so he was able to find out what had happened when he regained consciousness a few hours later in hospital. Luckily he suffered no major injuries but of course there’s no more such late night walks for him – or for many others of our kids as word spread fast. The attack was entirely random. Nobody has been arrested nor do we expect anybody will be.

People always ask how things like this can just start happening, and in this case I’m sure we’re looking at gang recruitment; “prove yourself to us”.

But there are plenty of examples from overseas, starting with Minneapolis. I knew only one thing about that smallish, Mid-Western city when I was growing up watching American TV in NZ:

Yeah, the hat throw in the intro to The Mary Tyler Moore Show. So iconic that the city put up a statue of it decades ago, which may almost be as popular as the ones for local hero George Floyd. Now the state’s Supreme Court has ordered the city to start hiring police officers to build up to the number legally required by city ordinances to meet legal requirements:

I’ve asked who in his right mind would go to work for the department. The Star Tribune is singing from the Beatles songbook: “Nothing’s gonna change my world.” At least the song comes with a mantra to soothe the troubled soul.

But I was also reminded of the following story from the USA, located in, of all places, a post by retired Law Professor Ann Althouse early in 2021 when she commented on seeing the Oscar-winning movie, Nomadland, “For people whose only home is a vehicle, the knock is a visceral, even existential, threat. How do you avoid it?”.

The movie is about an aging homeless woman who lives in an old van (“I’m not homeless. I’m just houseless.”) and travels around America seeking whatever work and comfort she can find. It was a story from one of her commentators that struck me in its similarities to the worsening crime situation in Auckland:

Until last year I lived in a neighborhood which used to be nice. Then, mysteriously, it began to fill with trash. My wife and I would walk the dog, and she would spend the walk picking up trash. Every day. I gave up.

Drug needles appeared on the ground. Our cars were broken into while parked in front of our house. Our trash and recycling would be rummaged through at night and we’d have to clean up the mess in the morning. Vehicles would park in a nearby side street and sit there until the cops came. They were replaced by more.

Finally, we moved. While our house was on the market someone broke in and left used needles in the toilet. Twice. It’s a great selling point for potential buyers.

In the new neighborhood, my wife doesn’t have to pick up trash on our daily walks. The worst thing we’ve had to deal with was someone leaving dog poop on the lawn. I do not believe in turning the homeless into a class of people who cannot be criticized. There’s nothing about being homeless that requires you to leave trash everywhere. There’s nothing that requires taking drugs. Or breaking into cars and houses.

I suspect, however, that people who are neat and law-abiding don’t tend to become homeless. I’ve worked a lot of minimum wage jobs and restaurant jobs, and I was always able to at least rent a room. What’s really being pushed by homeless activists is a lifestyle choice where the homeless are free of all social obligations- work, family, and community. It’s an antisocial way of life that harms other people. Homeless people aren’t disliked because they are houseless. It’s the trash and crime they create. They make life worse for the people around them.

But you can’t say any of this in public anymore. If you do, you are a privileged jerk because you want to live in a clean neighborhood while so many people are living in squalor.

Of course the idea where I live is that building lots of houses will obviously cure homelessness and thus reduce poverty and crime. So far the evidence is exactly the opposite. But it’s early days yet. As I said, the new houses look nice. My Chicago-born wife mutters “ghettos” as she drives through the areas.

At the last neighbourhood meeting in our area to discuss further housing developments, both public and private, that will quadruple the concentration of people living there, the authorities present suggested to the people who turned up that every effort would be made to educate them out of their various fears.

Written by Tom Hunter

June 28, 2022 at 6:00 am

Chicago on the Takapuna

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One of my favorite takes – especially when I am confronted by people raving about my focus on America – is that whatever crazy theory is created there will turn up here sooner or later.

So…. a couple of years ago, not long after I joined this blog I posted this…
Deck The Halls with Chutzpah:

And here we are two years later in NZ: compare and contrast

The funny thing is – if you’re in the mood for humor – when I covered the Chicago angle a couple of years ago on our old No Minister blog, I got this Leftie’s response:

Wizzard, allow me to introduce you to Tom Hunter, our resident racist. No one but Tom Hunter could draw a connection between crime in Chicago and New Zealand corrections policy.

But then, Tom Hunter is a supporter of a justice policy based on the rules of baseball.

You see? This is how it develops. Crime in our society is the result of class warfare.

Written by Tom Hunter

June 18, 2022 at 8:53 pm

A run on Chinese Banks

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My co-blogger Nick K had already flagged one of the first signals of a China bubble bursting when he wrote about the problems of one of their giant property developers, China Evergrande, in September of last year, all $US 300 billion worth of it.

Where’s there’s one there’s bound to be more if the underlying problem is not fixed, and so…:

Multiple sources contacted by Asia Markets, have confirmed deposits at the following six banks have been frozen since mid-April.

  • Yuzhou Xinminsheng Village Bank (located in Xuchang City, Henan Province)
  • Zhecheng Huanghuai Bank (City of Shangqui, Henan Province)
  • Shangcai Huimin Rural Bank (Zhumadian City, Henan Province)
  • New Oriental Village Bank (City of Kaifeng, Henan Province)
  • Huaihe River Village Bank (Bengbu City, Anhui Province)
  • Yixian County Village Bank (Huangshan City, Anhui Province)

It’s understood the banks with branches across the Henan and Anhui Provinces successively issued announcements in April, stating they would suspend online banking and mobile banking services due to a system upgrade.

At the same time, clients reported their electronic deposits in online accounts, mobile apps and third-party platforms could not be withdrawn.

This led to depositors rushing to local bank branches, only to be told they were unable to withdraw funds.

The report includes various videos of long lines at banks and protests so it appears to be a real thing and not just a rumour. The real question is whether the authorities can stop it, and that comes down to two questions to be answered: the degree of authority that can be exerted and the trust people have in the system. Nobody should doubt the power of the central Chinese State but when a people’s faith in institutions begins to waver there’s no force that can impose it:

Some depositors such as Xu have already lost trust in the system. The 39-year-old said he had withdrawn all of his deposits from 10 other small banks that had promised him an annualised yield of more than 4 per cent.

The Chinese Communist Party probably does not accept that last point, as can be seen in this sad article, The Dismantling of Hong Kong, by one Karen Cheung, who is approaching the tipping point of escape:

After the national security law passed in June 2020, friends began leaving Hong Kong every few weeks. One by one, they disappeared from the camera reel on my phone, leaving me with things they couldn’t take with them: an oven, a Sodastream, a sous-vide machine, a stone diffuser, and five bottles of ground cinnamon. From 2020 through 2021, it was reported that 116,000 residents had left, often departing for countries like Britain and Canada…

This has been coming for a long time; certainly since the first mass protests in 2014 but only really since the Great Chinese Sinus AIDS Pandemic hit:

Under the guise of pandemic social-distancing, public gatherings were banned, and protests disappeared from the streets. Later in 2020, a teacher had his license revoked after showing his class a documentary featuring a pro-independence activist; in the years since, prominent commentators, including Apple Daily writer Fung Wai-kong and academic Hui Po Keung, have been arrested at the airport while attempting to leave the city. New election rules implemented in 2021 now dictate that only “patriots” can administer Hong Kong. By early 2022, at least 50 civil organizations have disbanded in the ongoing crackdown, including a pro-democracy trade-union coalition and an activist group that commemorates the Tiananmen massacre.

My, how convenient is the claim of Public Health for tinpot dictators to exert minute control over the lives of their subjects. And as she outlines, the end result was a massive increase in cases and deaths anyway, plus the usual scenes of empty supermarket shelves and a failing public health care system:

Health officers would sometimes appear on your doorstep to inform you that your building had been locked down for mandatory testing; should you test positive, you would have to undergo quarantine at an isolation facility, which Hong Kong residents have described as a “madhouse.” A Hong Kong woman told a local news outlet that despite two negative rapid tests, she was not told when she could leave; some in quarantine attempted suicide inside the facilities, according to local media reports. The uncertainty and severity of the measures made me feel like the city was collectively being punished.

I’m absolutely sure it was. In that world it’s hard to tell the difference between political prisoners arrested for leading protests or writing articles and people who failed the dreaded C-19 test, since there seems little difference in treatment between the two.

I last visited Hong Kong in 1990 and it was great: a vast, teaming, lively city with beautiful views, whether from the waterfront or The Peak. But when the British handed back control to China in 1997 I knew the place was doomed, even if it might take years to show it. The CCP and their One Country: Two Systems always smelled like propaganda to me, but I relied on the CCP’s self-interest in hanging on to a rich crown jewel, especially as Communism became more honoured in the breach in China itself, hence more than two decades of peace, relative freedoms and prosperity. But I always knew that if a clash between the “Two Systems” ever occurred then the system of Chinese Communism would prevail and be imposed, whatever the cost.

Between the rise of Xi Jinping and the return of his cult of personality as well as the re-empowering of the Central State, the myriad little Cultural Revolution touches appearing again, the Hong Kong protests and finally the C-19 disease, it’s obvious that Hong Kong will soon be no more than another grim Chinese metropolis.

Something was fundamentally broken: If Hong Kong could botch the handling of a pandemic outbreak it had two years to prepare for, what does that say about future governance? Hong Kong used to be a city that understood its capitalism depended upon appearances; ever since the national security law was enacted, however, it no longer cared about the mask slipping.

Survivors guilt and all, it is time for Ms Cheung to get the hell out – and time for us to cut as many cords with China as we can afford.

Written by Tom Hunter

June 16, 2022 at 4:14 pm

Aborted Assassinations

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The results of a US survey were released the other day in which a rather unusual question was asked:

“Do you approve or disapprove of assassinating a politician who is harming the country or our democracy?”

Well, the answer is obvious surely? No!

Holy shit! Nearly half of Democrat men under the age of 50 (44 %) approved, as did 34% of younger Republican men, 40% of Republican woman, and 32% of Democrat woman. Look at the generation gap also!

And so we come to this. A man, Nicholas Roske, was arrested the other day when he turned up at the home of Supreme Court Justice Kavanaugh, equipped with a pistol, ammo, various bits of tactical gear, and openly calling the cops to tell them he was going to kill the Justice because of the anticipated US Supreme Court (SCOTUS) abortion decision. They’d already spotted him getting out of a taxi beside Kavanaugh’s home and looking damned suspicious to the Marshalls guarding the home so his call was moot.

Since last year I’d planned to do a post on the decision from the US Supreme Court (SCOTUS) on abortion, Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, expecting its release in June/July 2022. The most important such case in decades, with a majority of Originalist or Textualist judges on the Supreme bench, there was a distinct possibility that the fifty year old standard, Roe v Wade, and even the more recent confirmation of that decision, the 1992 case of Planned Parenthood vs Casey, would be overturned and the issue returned to the legislators of the fifty US states to decide. But I’m not going to address the actual decision until it’s confirmed.

However, that process was disrupted a month ago when persons unknown within SCOTUS leaked to the MSM a draft of the conservative opinion and argument. As expected it over-turns Roe and other similar cases and since it was written by Justice Alito it seems certain that it represents the majority. Nothing has since appeared to contradict that, although it’s still possible that it may be merely the dissent.

The leak itself was an unprecedented move that shocked the legal community because it struck directly at the heart of the Court’s ability to debate and decide constitutional issues free from immediate political pressures. It also struck at the heart of the trust required between the Justices themselves for those debates and arguments to occur in a dispassionate and calm way.

This was quite deliberate. Obviously a Court member, likely a clerk for one of the three Liberal Justices, possibly one of those three Justices themselves, had seen the decision and decided that public pressure might change it by convincing one of the conservative Justices to cave. Damage to the court be damned.

But of course they had outside help, in the form of the good old MSM, as Stromata points out in The Unsung Villians of the Supreme Court Leak:

Chief Justice Roberts has ordered the Court’s marshal to investigate the leak. Whether the culprit will be found seems dubious, but there are three guilty parties who can be identified and who, although they almost certainly cannot be prosecuted, can be shunned by all polite company. They are Politico and the two writers whose names appear on the story proclaiming the leak: Josh Gerstein and Alexander Ward.

Neither the web publisher nor its employees innocently picked up the draft opinion from off the street. They knew that it was stolen. They knew that no Supreme Court opinion has ever, in the history of the United States of America, been released without the Court’s authorization, no matter how important or controversial its subject. They knew that, in the normal course of its activity, the Court would have published its decision within the next two months. They knew that the Justices often continue considering and refining opinions until shortly before they are announced. They knew that the Court’s effectiveness has for over two centuries depended crucially on trust among the Justices and their staff.

They knew and didn’t care. For the frisson of a “big story”, and almost certainly with the hope of assisting the Democratic Party, they peddled their ill-gotten goods and inflicted serious harm on our nation’s highest judicial body. Honorable men would have written a story beginning, “Today, a person connected to the Supreme Court attempted to give Politico confidential Court documents concerning an upcoming decision. Politico has returned the documents unread to the Court chambers and advised the Justices of the identity of the miscreant.”

One of the benefits of an unfettered press is that scoundrels eventually identify themselves. Remember their names and cover them with maledictions: Politico, Gerstein, Ward.

The pro-abortion movement certainly treated the leak as both real and decisive and immediately cranked up the protests, aided by a Democrat Party that’s desperate to avoid an electoral disaster in this year’s Mid-Term elections in November. One group, Ruth Sent Us, went further, doxxing the locations of the conservative Justices and organising protests outside them. They tried to weasel out of being responsible by saying they hadn’t actually put up the addresses, but in their videos they made no effort to hide the house numbers. It was from this list that Roske got his targeting information.

Amidst all of this you had senior Democrats like VP Kamala Harris saying they would have “fight” with “everything we have”. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wasn’t much better as she specifically called on the public to act to “improve” the decision, about as clear an example of intimidation as you can get. Senate leader Chuck Schumer said that Justices Gorsuch, Kavanaugh and Coney Barrett had lied in their Senate hearings in answering questions on abortion, this on top of his comments two years ago to Gorsuch & Kavanaugh that:

“You will pay the price.. You won’t know what hit you if you go forward with these awful decisions”

Sure, you can argue that this is all just typical political hot air – which I could agree with if I hadn’t seen similar, ordinary political speech from the likes of Trump and Sarah Palin (in the Giffords shooting of 2011) held to be “incitement” to violent followers, with the MSM once more helping out by amplifying those claims while memory-holing the likes of Bernie Bro assassin, James T Hodgkinson and his shooting of GOP members of Congress

Moreover, Virginia State law prohibits such protesting against judges precisely because it is understood to be an attempt to intimidate them in making their decisions. Notably nobody has been prosecuted by either the Virginia law authorities or the Federal DOJ.

The cherry on top on is that President Biden, via his press secretary at the time, Jen Pasaki, refused to condemn the protests despite repeated invitations from some reporters to do so; encouragement with a wink from the President.

Finally, there are specific examples arising from the prosecution of violent criminal actions involving allies of the Democrats. The mug shots below are of two people – Colinford Mattis and Urooj Rahman – who were arrested in New York City in 2020 for assembling Molotov cocktails, handing them out to the “mostly peaceful” crowds protesting George Floyd’s death, and even firebombing an empty police car.

Ginning herself up to distribute explosives to the crowd, Rahman gave a video interview in which she declared, “This shit won’t ever stop until we fuckin’ take it all down,” adding that “the only way [the police] hear us is through violence.”

Domestic terrorism doesn’t get much clearer, no? Many years of jail time resulting?

Not so fast, lynchers:

They reached a plea deal with federal prosecutors in October 2020 that wiped out six of the seven charges against them. Those prosecutors, nonetheless, sought a maximum 10-year sentence and argued that the incident qualified for a so-called terrorism enhancement that would turbocharge sentencing–a determination with which the U.S. Probation Office concurred.

Well, that’s the marginally acceptable; charges are often dropped to focus on the important one. But then Merrick Garland – himself proposed for SCOTUS during Obama’s last year after Justice Scalia died – and the U.S. attorney for New York’s Eastern District, Breon Peace, who’s handling the prosecution, took office and in May, the same career DOJ prosecutors who had argued for that 10-year sentence were back in court withdrawing their plea deal, tossing out the terrorism enhancement entirely and entering a new one that allowed the defendants to cop to the lesser charge of conspiracy:

The new charge carries a five-year maximum sentence, but the prosecutors are urging the judge to go below that, asking for just 18 to 24 months on account of the “history and personal characteristics of the defendants” and the “aberrational nature of the defendants’ conduct.”

Because, you know, Mattis graduated from Princeton and New York University Law School and was an attorney at the white-shoe law firm Pryor Cashman, and Rahman was a public-interest lawyer whose “best friend,” Obama administration intelligence official Salmah Rizvi, guaranteed the $250,000 required to release her on bail.

Law360, which reported on the events, calls the new deal an “unusual step.”

That’s some understatement. Then combine this outcome with the hundreds of Antifa and BLM rioters from 2020 who had all charges dropped (only a handful convicted), Clinton and Democrat Party lawyer Michael Sussman being found not guilty by a jury selected from a 92% Biden voting D.C. pool, the wrist slap given FBI lawyer Clinesmith for falsifying CIA emails and lying to the FISA court, and the general escape from justice of the Obama-Clinton team players on the Russia-Collusion attempted coup.

In the face of all this why should anybody be surprised at either that poll result or Kavanaugh’s would-be assassin. It shows that you’re basically looking at a Democrat Party that not only encourages such violence against Republicans – politicians, activists and voters alike – but strongly signals that you’ll get away with it.

Time to re-visit the possibilities of A second American Civil War and A Civil Break, not a Civil War.

“What are you prepared to do now?”

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Those are the dying words of Police Officer Jimmy Malone to Eliot Ness in the movie classic, The Untouchables.

In a way this is a companion post to the one I did the other day on the Mahuta and Sussman stories, but this post is about lower level crimes involving the proles.

Recently there have been some very ugly videos emerging from New York City’s subway system including mass shootings, other random shootings, and people being pushed in front of trains.

But it’s actually recent video of a subway incident that did not end in death or serious injury, that has sparked what I think are the real questions about what is going in NYC, and likely across the USA and perhaps the entire Western world:

“Have a look at this footage from the subway in New York City where a man in the white jacket and black leggings is rampaging on a train. He targets a woman, sits next to her and begins to assault her. Looks like there are plenty of able-bodied men around watching.”
Rita Panahi, Sky News Australia

There certainly are, and it may be that many thoughts were going through their minds. Is the guy armed, (but if so what makes you think you won’t be next)? Can a non-Black man step in on a Black criminal’s actions? Should a Black man interfere with a Brother’s actions? Who ever does anything for people suffering from mental illness anyway, he’ll just be released the next morning?

Speaking of mental illness the guy who videoed this can be heard repeat, “I forgive this demon in the name of Jesus Christ”. I don’t condemn Christians who pray for others in their sorrow and misery, but I’m pretty sure that Christianity means trying to stop evil – with more than prayers if needed.

In her commentary on that video Rita Panahi called the men cowards and while that might be true it may also be that a lot of rationality is at work:

If I had to guess, they were standing in their place, checking their male privilege, toning down their toxic masculinity, and coping with how their Time’s Up.  Perhaps the men wanted a demonstration of how women are actually the stronger sex.  Perhaps the threat level just did not seem that high to them; New York has a duty to retreat, after all.  Besides, New York has been in the habit of arresting those who defend themselves.

Who wants to be the next George Zimmerman, Kyle Rittenhouse, Darren Wilson or the Covington Kids – or less famous cases:

In 2016, a 17-year-old Danish girl was arrested for defending herself with pepper spray from a would-be-rapist.  In 2020, a Virginia store clerk was arrested for defending his store from robbers.  Even an elderly U.K. pensioner was arrested for “stabbing a burglar to death.”  It is entirely possible that those men had such cases in mind.

But these are all individual cases surely? Ones that must be seen in the context of the specific situations? Why draw larger conclusions? Perhaps, but Ms Panahi does so with her next comment about the broader context of society:

“What does it say about society that not a single man stepped in to help – they allowed it to happen.”

But it’s this response from an American that sums up all of the above:

Well as I said last year about a similar story where a woman was actually raped on a Philadelphia train while another bunch of passengers just watched:

Before lifting a finger, unfree men must first decide whose permission they need to obtain, and what the judicial system is likely to do to them afterward. Free men are willing to act, knowing they are free.

Written by Tom Hunter

June 3, 2022 at 7:00 am

Posted in New Zealand

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