No Minister

Posts Tagged ‘freedom

Control your soul’s thirst for freedom

with 15 comments

Over the years I’ve read and seen a bunch of dystopian SF books and movies, stories that paint not a wonderful, sunny future enabled by miraculous technology, but a grim, dark, almost inhuman future where the technology oppresses us rather than freeing us.

Neuromancer, Bladerunner, Battlestar Gallactica (2003 reboot), Aliens, A.I., Gattica….

Yet somehow I never thought I’d get to see it.

That’s in Shanghai, one of the largest cities in the world: twenty five million people locked down by the Chinese government in pursuit of Covid Zero, which they still believe is possible even after two years of dealing with General Tso’s Syphilis. It feels like a repeat of the autistic focus on goals during the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution.

Between that and drones flying around apartment buildings broadcasting warnings while people scream from their balconies for food, plus beating corgies to death in the street and wrapping up cats in mesh bags on the sidewalks where they are collected to be killed, it’s safe to say that China is not a place anybody would like to be – and absolutely not a society we want to emulate, even though we increasingly do, starting with the concept of lockdowns.

I’d already covered a story about the CCP’s approach to pets in Time ran out for Pudding, where a little boy in Hong Kong had to hand over his pet hamster to be killed by the authorities. The cats in bags is another echo of the recent Chinese past:

Even China’s feline population suffered as Red Guards tried to eliminate what they claimed was a symbol of “bourgeois decadence”. “Walking through the streets of the capital at the end of August [1966], people saw dead cats lying by the roadside with their front paws tied together”

If you wish you can find videos of the cats in bags but I found the images too upsetting to put here, despite being not gory.

It’s not just events like this that have made me doubt the claim that the 21st century will be China’s. For various fundamental reasons arising from China’s history and culture I’ve long held the opinion that the current CCP control of the nation differs little from other dynasties stretching back 3000 years. A massively centralised, technocratic State government under which peace and prosperity increase for the population for a long time – followed by a decline in competence due to that centralised technocracy having no governing checks and failing to be refreshed with new minds and ideas, in-turn followed by peasant rebellions, the rise of feudal states and war. In the past the periods of peace might last for centuries, and the decline too, but today’s world moves faster.

Some of these problems are outlined in this article, Red Dusk, which discusses the problems of a declining working age population, the lack of state institutions that address health and retirement, and the growth of class divisions. I was especially amused by this:

Communist officials have been put in the awkward position of cracking down on Marxist study groups at universities, whose working-class advocacy conflicts with the policies of the nominally socialist government.

For all the talk of what their centralised goverment can achieve (and has achieved) – admired by the likes of Bill Gates, Justin Trudeau and Paul Krugman, among many other of the West’s ruling class – I see no evidence that the CCP has real answers to any of those problems. Worse still, their economic success has seen a rise in the old chauvinism that it’s all down to their superior culture, ignoring the fact that as recently as the 17th century, Europe ranked below China in almost any measure of power, but that it was the Western culture of allowing a diversity of ideas across a range of culture, from art to business to politics, that enables Europe to rise in power far beyond China.

That has not changed, despite some pretty awful excesses that have developed recently in the West – excesses which mirror aspects of China under the CCP, primarily conformism and control. But those have their limits, as Nazi Germany, Imperialist Japan, the USSR, Mao’s China and a host of smaller nations have found.

We need to uncouple ourselves from China, although economically that may not be possible because we’re too far gone ourselves. But perhaps just focus on nothing but economic trade with them and dump everything else about the “relationship”. Twenty years ago the Free Trade people argued that we would be exporting our values to Communist China (I was one of them), but it’s become obvious that we’re not and instead are importing their values into our society.

Perhaps I’m too pessimistic about the Chinese situation? In a small way the fact that the CCP is using a phrase that acknowledges the human soul’s desire for freedom is perhaps a tell. I don’t recall any Chinese communist campaign of the past that even used the word “freedom”, let alone the idea of it being tied to an individual human soul.

In other words I’d have expected the drones to be shouting communist boilerplate propaganda in commanding tones – “No person and no force can stop the march of the Chinese people toward better lives!“, or some such shite – rather than making what almost feels like a spiritual appeal to the people.

Written by Tom Hunter

April 14, 2022 at 8:50 am

Stamping on a human face forever

with 13 comments

As we slowly crawl toward freedom and away from the mandates and restrictions surrounding General Tso’s Sickness pandemic, it’s worth knowing that there will always be a part of the population that loved all this and are feeling bereft.

You see it with people still wearing masks outdoors and while driving cars alone, or who still hold their phones to scan in before entering shops.

It turns out that not everybody likes freedom, and based on my everyday observations the percentage is too high for comfort in (supposedly) freedom-loving democracy.

So the following cartoon seems appropriate.

I’d forgotten about this survey from the USA.

Written by Tom Hunter

April 13, 2022 at 10:27 am

The blood of the mind

leave a comment »

That’s a quote from an Indian economist, Madhav Das Nalapat, who was writing about some of the cultural aspects of the so-called “Anglosphere”, the English-speaking world.

India, because it was colonised for about two centuries by Britain, is part of that world. Every Indian IT person I worked with told me that English was one of the unifying aspects of the nation; in many cases they literally could not understand their fellow Indians native tongues.

The quote comes from an interesting essay which argues that many of the freedoms we associate with the world today are actually rooted in the English language itself, where concepts that started as natural parts of the lives of people in Britain, became encoded into the language.

An Australian philosopher named David Stove analysed a number of catastrophic ideas from the likes of Plotinus, Hegel, Foucault and others and noted something strange:

He quoted his examples in translation, he acknowledges, but notes that “it is a very striking fact . . . that I had to go to translations. . . .  Nothing which was ever expressed originally in the English language resembles, except in the most distant way, the thought of Plotinus, or Hegel, or Foucault. I take this,” Stove concludes, “to be enormously to the credit of our language.”

Given the ongoing and growing disaster in the West that is Foucault’s Post-Modernism, I’m not so sure we can be confident about the strength of traditional ideas of freedom in English. Still, the following gave me hope:

Andrew Roberts, reflecting on the pedigree of certain ideas in the lexicon of freedom, notes that such key phrases as “liberty of conscience” (1580), “civil liberty” (1644, a Miltonic coinage) and “liberty of the press” (1769) were first expressed in English. Why is it that English-speaking countries produced Adam Smith and John Locke, David Hume, and James Madison, but not Hegel, Marx or Foucault? “The tongue and the philosophy are not unrelated,” the philologist Robert Claiborne writes in The Life and Times of the English Language. “Both reflect the ingrained Anglo-American distrust of unlimited authority, whether in language or in life.”

All very nice but – paraphrasing Bill Clinton – it increasingly seems to depend on what the meaning of “unlimited” is.

Written by Tom Hunter

March 30, 2022 at 4:25 pm

Oh man, the Hippies have sold out again. 🤣

In the late 1960’s the hippies gloried in the mud, drugs and sex of a thousand Woodstocks while also protesting against the Vietnam War and “The Man”, and loudly proclaiming the dawning of the Age of Aquarius in overcoming Capitalism via lovely little communes. Admittedly there were plenty of young Baby Boomers who might not have been hippies but cosplayed at being one via hair, clothes and drugs, but the hippie remained the iconic symbol of it all.

One of the reasons for the emergence of Punk Music in the late 1970’s was the observation that the hippies had sold out on pretty much all their principles and become born-again capitalists, among other things, and were using this power to continue to push a lot of shitty music that didn’t rebel against anything, let alone the economic and other problems of that time.

By the 1980’s they had turned into yuppies (Young Urban Professionals) and started voting for Reagan. In New Zealand the crowning glory for these long-haired gits was to become Labour MP’s, tear down much of the First Labour Government’s institutions and impose a whole lot of capitalism in its place. To be fair they did give the finger to Reagan and the US in general on matters military and began the process of social liberalisation, but those were cheap and easy wins.

Money remained their god, as it is to this day.

Which brings me to the news about Joe Rogan. If you haven’t heard of him or listened to him it’s probably because you’re still watching One News and reading the NZ Herald or listening to Radio NZ instead of listening to his podcasts on the Spotify music streaming service, where his listener/viewers run to some 11 million per podcast – compared to CNN’s 500,000.

Rogan is definitely not a hippie. He’s Gen X, with all that that implies about treating much of the information about our world with cynical, skeptical, humour. As such he’s recently run into a bit of a storm about his interviews with people like Doctor Robert Malone and other critics of various aspects of the world’s Covid-19 responses. His personal stance is also “problematic” for his critics, as he’s openly discussed catching the disease (Delta in his case) plus using forbidden treatments like Ivermectin, Vitamin D supplements and so forth – and not getting the c-19 vaccinations.

This has made him a target, especially of the dying CNN, with demands he be booted from Spotify for all his “misinformation”. As those demands have failed the accusations have shifted from that to racism (his past use of the word “nigger” in quoting others – just like Joe Biden, Cenk Uygur and Anna Kasparian) and with that also failing he’s now being accused of January 6-type “insurrectionist” thinking.

One of the most prominent examples of the pressure applied came several weeks ago when aging 60’s rocker Neil Young made a big public splash about pulling his music from Spotify if they didn’t boot Rogan. Young was quickly followed by another hippie icon, Joni Mitchell.

All this got the MSM very excited. Spotify followed their requests – and pulled their music in late January, while keeping Rogan.

Gen-X cynics like me noted the deep irony of Young’s demands. We also noted the fact that aging “rebels” really, really don’t like fading away and being ignored, and that Young in particular had a history of pulling PR stunts like this – followed by tours.

And so we come to this…

… just this morning [Feb 14], I was able to pull up both these dedicated champions of the Man’s approved COVID-19 narrative on Spotify.

🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

BTW – here’s those Young Turks of the modern Democrat Party, Cenk Uygur and Anna Kasparian, having the same discussions as Rogan did.

Written by Tom Hunter

February 15, 2022 at 12:53 pm

As a nation of free men we will live forever or die by suicide.

Freedom is slowly beginning to break out again in the Western democracies.

Not all of them of course, but let’s start with Britain from January 19th.

“Next week mandatory [vaccine] certification will end… We will end the compulsory use of Covid status certification in England… From now, the government is no longer asking people to work from home and people should now speak to their employers about arrangements for returning to the office… [T]he government will no longer mandate the wearing of face masks anywhere… we will trust the judgement of the British people and no longer criminalise anyone who chooses not to wear one [mask]… There will soon come a time when we can remove the legal requirement to self-isolate altogether – just as we don’t place legal obligations on people to isolate if they have flu… We will set out our long-term strategy for living with Covid-19, explaining how we hope and intend to protect our liberty and avoid restrictions in future by relying instead on medical advances…”

The thing is that Johnson made this seminal declaration at the height of the flu season during which Britain has been posting record numbers of Covid cases: 92,000 per day, with 266 deaths per day, the highest daily rate since March 2021. Yet he just up and cancelled the “pandemic”.

Forget his argument about the booster shot program; compared to the double-dose campaign we’re not going to see 90% rates of the eligible population (translating into 70-80% total population) or anything close to that.

Admittedly Boris is in deep shit over his 2020 parties, held when everybody else was locked down, so desperately seeking a circuit breaker that will get him onside with the public again. But Ireland is on the same path too:

Ireland is to scrap almost all its COVID-19 restrictions on Saturday after coming though the storm of the Omicron variant that led to a massive surge in infections, Prime Minister Micheal Martin said in a national address.

However, we appear to have created a class of people who wish to live with lockdowns, restrictions and endless boosters forever. The following is from the USA but I see no reason why it would not equally be the case in most other Western democracies.

In the USA it’s causing a fight on the Left, with Bill Maher and guest Bari Weiss – no friends of the Right who have been scathing about those fighting against lockdowns, masks and the General Tso Sickness vaccines – starting to get red-pilled on the issues. Maher even compares Florida to New Jersey / New York, asking why the former has done so much better than the latter despite having a huge population of elderly people and not following the Blue State path of restrictions.

Two years late but I’ll take it

This did not sit well with the ladies of The View. Now normally I wouldn’t reference this show because it’s one of the lowest IQ things on TV and has been for two decades: dumb does not even begin to describe it. Yet a few months ago I found out that a person I know, a woman who has always seemed fairly intelligent, gets all her information about the US from the show. Check it out for yourself.

FFS. These woman actually think it will be a repeat of what happened post-9/11 world (which brought us the kabuki theatre of TSA checks in airports among other things), and they want these new restrictions to be permanent.

One last example of such people. Some Canadian reporter from Quebec – where they’re using security guards to escort the unvaxxed into stores for food and pharma only – decided to escape for a holiday. He went to Florida and reports back that, Florida feels like another planet compared with Quebec.

Except he doesn’t mean that as a compliment! It’s incredible, but having soaked up the freedom and the sun he does nothing but bitch about it.

While Quebec is in full confinement mode, Florida is Cowboyland, where you barely know COVID is happening, despite much higher new case and hospitalization rates than ours .

It’s lunacy by Canadian standards, but an eye-opening experience. For starters, everyone’s out and about, filling bars, restaurants, movies, gyms, and jam-packed sports arenas.

Stores and supermarkets don’t require masks but some cashiers and customers wear them, though often under their nose or chin — Florida-style. It seems a way of announcing: “Look — I’m masked!” when they’re not.

The Horror. The Horror.

You can see the difference in the media, too. In Quebec, COVID totally dominates the news, because there’s almost nothing else happening. In Florida, it’s the reverse.

Oh Noes! There are many LOL moments in the piece but I’ll leave you with this:

It’s easy to spot Canadians at restaurants, as we’re the ones properly masked and nervously sitting on the terrace, even in the rain.

We Montrealers live in a tense, depressing pandemic bubble — all-COVID, all the time — which is why many people avoid following the news.

MUHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHAH.

Though perhaps I should give him credit for going to Florida. Most of New Zealand would be too terrified to do so.

Written by Tom Hunter

January 28, 2022 at 8:09 am

Free men and unfree men

Free men are willing to act, knowing they are free.

It’s not the task of blogs to report the news, let alone the latest news. Blogs are here to analyse things, in particular to try and extract meaning that the news does not have in its immediacy and its shallowness.

But sometimes there are news stories that fit so perfectly with things under discussion that they should be noted when they happen.

In this case it’s a story out of Philadelphia about a rape that occurred on a city commuter train.

A man whom officials identified as Fiston Ngoy sat down next to a woman at about 10 p.m. on a train that was traveling westbound on the Market-Frankford Line toward the 69th Street Transportation Center. Mr. Ngoy “attempted to touch her a few times,” said Andrew Busch, a spokesman for the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, known as SEPTA.

The woman pushed back and tried to stop Mr. Ngoy from touching her, Mr. Busch said. “Then, unfortunately, he proceeded to rip her clothes off,” Mr. Busch said on Sunday.

The assault lasted about eight minutes, and no passengers in the train car intervened, the authorities said.

“I’m appalled by those who did nothing to help this woman,” Timothy Bernhardt, the superintendent of the Upper Darby Township Police Department, said on Sunday. “Anybody that was on that train has to look in the mirror and ask why they didn’t intervene or why they didn’t do something.”

Oh, but it gets worse…

Police Chief Thomas Nestel III said “as many as 10 people actually saw some part of the attack on this rider.” He said the police checked the surveillance video, “We were watching to see if somebody put a phone up to their ear indicating they might be calling 911. Instead, what we saw was people holding their phone up as if they were recording or taking pictures.

Then worse…

Ngoy is an illegal alien who entered legally on a student visa in 2012, but then overstayed. Court records show that Ngoy had multiple arrests and two misdemeanor convictions, one for controlled substances and one for sexual abuse.

He pleaded guilty to the sex charge in 2017 in Washington DC and was sentenced to 120 days in jail, and was then placed in immigration detention in January 2018.

However, Ngoy was never deported, because an immigration judge granted him a ‘withholding of removal’ in March 2019, after an appeals board found that his sex crime was not a ‘serious crime’ that made him eligible for removal.

Most of the foreign MSM and non-MSM reports I’ve seen about this incident have contained the obligatory journalist passages of prose that say things along the lines of “It’s hard to imagine what’s going on in the souls of people who would respond that way”, and yadda, yadda, yadda.

Sure, these people are horrible cowards and hardly any better than the attacker themselves, but how different are they from the judge and an appeals board that let him stay in the USA after deciding that his particular earlier sex crime was not a “serious crime”?

The fact is that the two sets of people create one another.

What if the people on the train had stepped in to punch and kick what at first sight was a homeless man with Minority Person Of Colour status? You think they would have been praised, especially if they were White Males, or would they have been trashed in the MSM? Not to mention facing perhaps the now condemnatory judicial system who freed the attacker from his previous crimes.

Before lifting a finger, unfree men must first decide whose permission they need to obtain, and what the judicial system is likely to do to them afterward. Free men are willing to act, knowing they are free.

Written by Tom Hunter

October 21, 2021 at 4:00 pm

Your Graphics friend who’s fun to be with.

I know that broadcast TV has been falling away as its Boomer audience ages and dies but it’s not until you see a fact like this that you can grasp the scale of it:

Fifty million Americans tuned in to Johnny Carson’s last appearance on The Tonight Show. Today, his Tonight Show successor, along with the egregious Stephen Colbert on The Late Show on CBS, barely have 2 million viewers on a good night…

Carson’s farewell was in 1992. The following is always the sign of a maturing industry, and often a dying one.

Of course there are still growth industries (graphic courtesy of The Times). The last US flight out of Kabul departed a few hours ago.

So I guess it’s back to focusing on Chinese Lung Rot, with a seeming increase in social and media pressure to vaccinate kids now.

I wonder what we’re doing to the usual building of immune systems in children?

Written by Tom Hunter

August 31, 2021 at 9:30 am

The hackers strike back

In a world, incredibly the Western world, where freedom seems to be under ever greater threat than before – due less to government than to people apparently not rating it as much as they used to – it’s nice to see an example of a fightback.

In this case the story is especially meaningful because there has been much coverage in recent years of how Information Technology (IT) is now enabling The Powers That Be to spy on us in ever more detailed ways. The old East German Stasi would have given up their first-born sons for the sort of spying tech that China’s security services are employing – and likely those of the West as well.

Belarus is one such country, never having recovered from its Communist culture when it found itself a new and separate nation after the collapse of the USSR (it having been of those “Republics”). Former communist bigwig Alyaksandr Lukashenka quickly figured out how to get on top and stay there in this new world, with all his totalitarian, authoritarian instincts born of a communist life having ameliorated not one bit. He’s been the leader of the nation since the early 1990’s, complete with the usual sham elections.

Naturally one of his tools was the internal security services, former KGB types, but now with extra computer power allowing huge centralised databases containing untold amounts of personal information on ordinary people.

Of course, while you can have such centralisation of data nowadays thanks to IT, you can’t actually centralise the IT itself. The very nature of modern IT systems is that they are distributed; the amount of computer power available to ordinary people is also vast, and increasing everyday, which means these ordinary people can do things that only nations could do – like finding ICBM sites from private satellite photos.

And so…

While refraining from naming an exact number of files, the hackers claim to have obtained classified passport records for the Belarusian security forces’ leadership, members of Lukashenka’s inner circle, plus State Security Committee (KGB) employees, including intelligence officers operating in the European Union.

On July 26, the group’s Telegram channel teased passport data for KGB Chairman Ivan Tertel;

Each individual’s dossier, the hackers claim, contains passport photos and data; his or her residence permit; the name of the government body or military unit for which the person works; the names of family members, “and so on.”

“Will many KGB agents be ready to operate abroad, knowing that data about them has already leaked?” one of the hackers asked rhetorically in a bot-assisted Telegram chat with Current Time.

Aside from passport data, the Cyberpartisans claim to have accessed the records of the Belarusian traffic police, which the hackers say include information on registered cars for the KGB, the anti-corruption police, and tsikhary (“silent men”), masked muscle men in plainclothes known for brutally rounding up suspected protesters.

It’s a great example of the lack of culture change since 1991 that Belarus still has an actual KGB, they didn’t even bother changing the name, so much in love with their totalitarian past are they.

The cyber hack is yet to be confirmed, but as the article points out:

To verify the Cyberpartisans’ claim of having hacked Belarus’ passport database, Current Time submitted to the hackers the names and dates of birth of two Belarusian citizens, who agreed to the information’s release.

After a few minutes’ search in their alleged data trove, the Cyberpartisans sent the two Belarusians’ complete passport details, their official places of residence and work, and also technical information — for example, that one passport no longer has the space to affix visas.

Seems like confirmation to me. The logo below is that of the hacker group.

Written by Tom Hunter

August 13, 2021 at 10:20 am

I can hear the people sing now!

This is a truly great scene: a huge crowd of Hong Kong protesters gathered on the day of US Thanksgiving….

… singing The Star Spangled Banner.

At the end they even threw in a few good chants of “USA, USA, USA…”

This is absolutely beautiful to watch. It even beats the HK school kids version of “Can You Hear The People Sing” that I wrote about a few months ago.

It’s always great to see people reaching out to a real beacon of liberty. Funny how truly oppressed people always know the sources of actual freedom.


The reason for this outburst of thanks is down to two bills signed into law by President Trump last Wednesday, both of which have overwhelming bipartisan support in Congress.

The first is the The Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, which requires the State Department to certify once a year that Hong Kong is sufficiently autonomous to retain its special U.S. trading rights.

A second bill makes it illegal to sell munitions like tear gas and rubber bullets to the Hong Kong police.

Nobody – not least the people of Hong Kong – is under any illusions that either bill will stop the crushing of the protesters by the Chinese Communists if they get desperate. If the choice is between the survival of the CCP and permanently damaging the economic jewel of Hong Kong, the Communist leaders of China will not hesitate in choosing the former option.

But both Acts will at least give them pause for thought, and it certainly got under their skins enough that they issued this statement:

“We are officially telling the U.S. and the handful of opposition politicians in Hong Kong who follow America’s lead to not underestimate our determination to protect Hong Kong’s prosperity and stability, don’t underestimate our belief to protect the ‘one country, two systems policy’ and don’t underestimate our capabilities and strategies in protecting our country’s sovereignty, safety, growth and rights.

This so-called bill will only make the Chinese people, including our compatriots in Hong Kong, further understand the sinister intentions and hegemonic nature of the United States. It will only make the Chinese people more united and make the American plot doomed to fail”

Heh, heh, heh. It’s as if they’ve learned nothing over the decades about the boilerplate bullshit nature of their Communist language.

Yes, this is “angering” China but they’re going to be pricks anyway. Take a gander at just some of the Tweets from some lickspittle toady named Lijian Zhao from China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs as he went apeshit on the USA:

To be fair those could all be from the editorial pages of The New York Times, Washington Post, the Democrat Party, or any member of the global Left. Most of these talking points are cribbed from them anyway, the CCP propaganda departments apparently thinking it sways Americans to have the bullshit of their own Left-Wing ladled back to them. The USSR tried the same moral equivalence tactics in the 1970’s and 1980’s and failed. But it continues to this day with Putin also always pushing the whole “You’re no better than us, and probably worse” line.

But the key point here is that Hong Kong’s protesters at their Thanksgiving rally were not interested in debating the legal and geopolitical aspects of the US laws or even China’s “anger”.  They were thanking America for standing with them.

We know it’s a fight we have to fight on our own,” said one 50-year-old man holding up an American flag at the rally, “But it’s good to have friends who stand by us.”

“Thank you, President Trump,” said one 21-year-old Hong Kong woman, who was wearing a face mask and holding up a sign with an American flag.

“Thank you to America,” said a 25-year-old Hong Kong man, also wearing a face mask, and waving an American flag. He called it a “miracle” that America has passed the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, and said that whatever it amounts to in practice, he is grateful for the basic message: “It told us that we are not alone.”

Well, until the tanks start moving across the border, at which point there will be nothing kinetic that the USA or the rest of the world can do.

But in the face of that grim reality, it also seems that the protesters have a sense of trolling humour that the entire US MSM lacked, as they carted around blow-ups of Trump’s “Rocky” tweet.

They understand that it was a joke – but they also know it wasn’t only a joke.

I still don’t hold out much hope for them to retain their liberty from the Communists, but you never know: in Eastern Europe eventually,  “Das Volk Siegt“.

Written by Tom Hunter

December 1, 2019 at 5:12 am

Can You Hear The People Sing?

While living in London in the late 80’s I went to a performance of the musical Les Miserables, and while I thoroughly enjoyed it I can’t say I was too impressed by the music. To put it bluntly, there was nothing that memorable about the songs. Every musical needs at least one stand-out tune that you might find yourself humming outside the theatre.

“Can You Hear The People Sing” is not such a song – and it’s the best known number from the musical.

Still, it’s nice to see that it has some meaning in the world, as these Hong Kong schoolkids showed the other day:

WOW.

Singing that over the top of the Chinese National Anthem at the start of the school year! Bloody brave. I hope their parents are proud of them.

The writer of the original song, 95 year-old Herbert Kretzmer, certainly is:

As I watched them on television from my home in West London, I felt a lump rise to my throat.

Not only because I admired their bravery in standing up to Communist China, which is trying to force a new extradition bill on Hong Kong that could consign anyone living in the Territory to the sham Chinese ‘justice’ system. But because the words they were singing were words I had written 33 years ago — and I knew the song in question had been banned in China.

I believed that such a protest song, sung in solidarity, could overwhelm not only the repressive 1830s French police state depicted in Les Miserables but also the mighty dictatorships of our own times, whether in the form of Soviet Communism, fascist regimes or the supporters of Apartheid in my homeland, South Africa.
….
Do you hear the people of Hong Kong? They are standing up for their rights.

At 93, I can only be with them in spirit. But my words are on their lips — and I am singing with them, too.

Wonder what CIA agent – aside from Kretzmer of course – inspired the schoolkids actions?

And of course the whole thing has an incredible parallel with one of the greatest and most famous scenes in movie history:

Still, we should not forget that straight after that performance the leader of the German contingent, Major Strasser, confronts Ilsa Lund with a blunt truth that no doubt parallels the thoughts of the Chinese Communist leadership with regard to Hong Kong.

My dear, perhaps you have already observed that in Casablanca human life is cheap“.

Written by Tom Hunter

September 6, 2019 at 10:07 pm

Posted in China

Tagged with , , ,