No Minister

Posts Tagged ‘House prices

Moby Dick

with 3 comments

It seems appropriate to thus start this little Wednesday morning collection of tasty graph and cartoon bites with something published two years ago that has turned out to be very accurate.

Call him Ishmael.

You can see why the MSM misses Trump. Now they have to put their double standards on full display.

In other predictions of the future this one for 2020, written in 1988 is awesome (RPG stands for Role Player Game).

When forecasting the future though it’s usually good to look at the past as well, as this graph of disease pandemics in Sweden does.

Here’s a graph about vaccine passports and mandates, since we seem to be moving on from lockdown mandates and mask mandates, which show similar failures. Here’s the detailed article from which the graph is taken, An inconvenient truth – vaccine passports don’t work:

Sometimes the future is entirely predictable, as with German power prices, courtesy of almost twenty years and €500 billion spent on the fabulous Energiewende (“Energy Transition”) project to get all that juicy renewable power from the wind and the sun. In such latitudes it’s more the wind but it makes no difference anyway. If your question in response to this is, “But the wind is free, why is power so expensive now?”, then you should SFTU on this subject for the rest of time. Also see this as New Zealand circa 2035 if we keep pushing the same stuff. Of course we could go nuclear?

Finally I’ll leave you with this graph, courtesy of Michael Reddell’s latest updated analysis of housing costs in New Zealand, especially in relation to incomes, Price/income ratios, with the key insight:

At best, it takes 33 years for price/income ratios to get back to three – the sort of ratio seen in large chunks of the US, in cities large and small. At best, it would take almost a quarter of a century to get back to a price/income ratio of four.

Basically the only way my kids are going to be able to buy a house is if we leverage the hell out of our existing one, and even then it may mean not living in Auckland. As Bob Jones has pointed out, now linking to BNZ economist Tony Alexander, they may not be living in NZ at all once the Chinese Xi Snot controls are gone and they get the chance at higher incomes, lower costs and not being locked up.

You should check out Reddell’s earlier posts on the housing problem, which I’ve quoted a few times here.

Frankly I can no longer see this being resolved, given that, as he points out, both the leaders of the National and Labour Parties said the other day that significant price drops – say 25% – would not be acceptable. Why? It would simply put us back two years. Although buyers in the last two years would be looking at negative equity, that’s a temporary situation that can be worked out of and has been in the past.

If you’re not willing to unwind a clearly screwed-up marketplace by even a small amount because some recent entrants will feel some (book-value) pain then you’re basically admitting that the current situation of relentless and ever larger price increases will continue, which will lock out a lot more potential entrants, particularly the young. The graph above is a “best-case” scenario if price drops are not permitted – and it shows an awful situation for people wanting to enter the housing market.

In a sense our housing market has become rather like any welfare system or drug addiction: the more people who are hooked on it the less chance there is of changing it. The only difference is that with housing it’s the newest entrants who have the most to lose.

Which means that what we have here is a Ponzi scheme, and they never end well. But they do end, irrespective of the authorities.

Written by Tom Hunter

December 15, 2021 at 11:04 am

Inflation heading this way in 2022

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In effect we’ve already been seeing inflation in New Zealand for a year now, as the huge flush of government created / borrowed money, designed to keep businesses and people afloat, has flowed into a New Zealand economy that could not absorb it thanks to lockdowns and other restrictions imposed by the government to fight the great Chinese Xi Snot pandemic. It’s just that our inflation has mainly been in the form of insane increases in house prices across the nation, none more so than in Auckland (Refer to the chart at the end of this article).

But in the US inflation is not showing up in house prices – yet. Over there it’s crashing into people’s consciousness in the prices they’re paying for everyday products.

Inflation hit 6.8% for November, which is the worst mark since 1982 when the country was still recovering from the Jimmy Carter years.

That’s just the generic figure and its calculation quite deliberately misses some everyday things. For ordinary people the following is the real inflation they’re facing.

Incidentally that article points out that this shocking piece of economic news is the likely reason why the following happened…

Earlier in the week, news broke that the White House had been colluding with mainstream media outlets in order to change the narrative surrounding Joe Biden’s fledgling economy. That collusion quickly produced results, with outlets such as CNN, MSNBC, and CNBC complaining that the administration was being treated unfairly.

Inflation for some of these things are already flowing into NZ, starting with the price of petrol. But the rest will be along soon enough to add to our already unaffordable homes, as pointed out by Mr Reddell at Croaking Cassandra:

If house price inflation slowed to 1 per cent per annum, year in year out and incomes rose by 2.6 per cent per annum, in 20 years time the nationwide price/income ratio would be 5.85.

And if by some chance you think a price/income of 6 doesn’t sound too bad. well (a) you’ve just too used to latter day New Zealand, and (b) check the table on page 15 of the Demographia report for the metropolitan areas (most of them) with ratios lower than 6, in lots of cases much much lower. New York – never really thought of as a cheap place to live – shows at 5.9, Montreal at 5.6, Manchester (UK) at 4.8, Nashville at 4.2, Edmonton at 3.8, and on downwards.

Graph from an older post, A Distorted Economy:

Written by Tom Hunter

December 11, 2021 at 5:00 pm

Thought for the day

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I wonder if these three things are linked? Like, even at all, just a little bit.

This, Quantatative Easing and then this (below).

Written by Nick K

September 15, 2021 at 8:02 am

Posted in New Zealand

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I’M INTERESTED IN YOUR REACTION

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Written by The Veteran

May 21, 2021 at 2:44 pm

Posted in New Zealand

Tagged with ,

Why Is It So?

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Today’s  Herald runs a breathless story by a useless reporter who lacks the brains to ask ‘Why is it so?

(Does anyone remember the remarkable professor Julius Sumner-Miller whose catch phrase was ‘Why is it so?’)

Image result for julius sumner miller

Apparently there are many high end residential properties in Auckland which have remained empty for many months and in some cases years.   I read the article, hoping for enlightenment but there was none.  Just some dreary statistics regurgitated by a tired scribe.

Of course there had to be a sensational picture.

A Spanish-style, turret-topped Herne Bay house at 81 Sarsfield St has stood empty for years and is now being demolished. Photo / Jason Oxenham

Auckland’s most high-profile empty mansion is the Spanish-style, turret-topped Herne Bay house at 81 Sarsfield St, which is thought to be worth about $15 million. It has stood empty for years and is now being demolished.

It’s pretty easy to figure out why so many high priced properties are vacant.  Nobody wants to buy the bloody things because the rice is too high.  Pretty simple really.  And as for the property pictured above, it’s not worth $15 million or any where near it.  It is worth land value less demolition costs.

Written by adolffinkensen

July 17, 2016 at 10:55 pm

Posted in New Zealand

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